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Arnold
02-12-2013, 03:26 PM
Just wondering. Going back 50 plus years in this game, it seems to me that only relatively recently have I heard phrases like " I golfed today" or "we were golfing Pinehurst".
The Scots seem to always call it "the golf".
Not of earthshattering importance. But, I always feel if it is used as a verb, it is an indication that someone is relatively new to the golf.

JTnumbers
02-12-2013, 03:28 PM
I golf often.
I like to golf.

Yes.

Smallville
02-12-2013, 03:29 PM
I say "I golfed today". I also say "I am going golfing."

I've golfed since 1977.

War Eagle
02-12-2013, 03:29 PM
You can use it for just about any part of the sentence really.

War Eagle
02-12-2013, 03:29 PM
You can use it for just about any part of the sentence really.

What do Golfers do?

"Golfers golf."

Darren K.
02-12-2013, 03:30 PM
It's almost as versatile as the F word.

huhhh
02-12-2013, 03:34 PM
I was just thinking about this today. I saw someone's license plate frame that said "I'd rather be golfing". While I agree...Golf is not a verb. That's always botherd me. You go play golf...you don't go golf. sheesh...i'm gonna go golf someone now.

Jjmorris
02-12-2013, 03:34 PM
It's almost as versatile as the F word.

I was going to say this. My cousin's classmate wrote a thesis on the versatility of the F word. Legendary.

Smallville
02-12-2013, 03:35 PM
It's almost as versatile as the F word.

That is a good piece.

Smallville
02-12-2013, 03:35 PM
I was going to say this. My cousin's classmate wrote a thesis on the versatility of the F word. Legendary.

I hope it wasn't the one that everyone has seen. Unless he actually wrote the original!

huhhh
02-12-2013, 03:35 PM
Golf you!!!

El Bandito
02-12-2013, 03:37 PM
It's almost as versatile as the F word.
Golf me, I'm golfing golfed....
I see what you mean.

Jjmorris
02-12-2013, 03:37 PM
I hope it wasn't the one that everyone has seen. Unless he actually wrote the original!

The second i wrote that I caught myself. it was something along those lines, but not the viral one. Totally forgot about that.

adwillingham
02-12-2013, 03:37 PM
I know people use it as a verb, but that really does drive me nuts and is one of my pet peeves.

You don't hear pros say "I golfed really well today".

Darren K.
02-12-2013, 03:38 PM
Golf me, I'm golfing golfed....
I see what you mean.
I didn't say it was a replacement for the F word...

Smallville
02-12-2013, 03:39 PM
I know people use it as a verb, but that really does drive me nuts and is one of my pet peeves.

You don't hear pros say "I golfed really well today".

Doesn't bother me. Although I think I say that.

But not very often! hahaha

War Eagle
02-12-2013, 03:39 PM
Works for me, Thain.

CharlieMoy
02-12-2013, 03:39 PM
I'm more of a

"I play golf" "lets go play golf" kinda guy.

Although I'm sure I've used both at some point.


^Siri probably sucks.

Arnold
02-12-2013, 03:40 PM
Checked Websters. Thye have it listed as a noun and intransitve verb( so no, "golf you).
But, my dad andthe old Irish pro at the course where I caddied as kid would correct folks who used it as a verb.
Wonder if the verb use is relatively recent.
Just doesn't fit my ear . But, I can adapt.

CharlieMoy
02-12-2013, 03:40 PM
Works for me, Thain.

I don't know wth was up with it but it wouldn't let me reply lol.


^Siri probably sucks.

huhhh
02-12-2013, 03:42 PM
Checked Websters. Thye have it listed as a noun and intransitve verb( so no, "golf you).
But, my dad andthe old Irish pro at the course where I caddied as kid would correct folks who used it as a verb.
Wonder if the verb use is relatively recent.
Just doesn't fit my ear . But, I can adapt.
Oh man....

yeah still not a verb though.

Mr. Satchmo
02-12-2013, 03:42 PM
It's almost as versatile as the F word.

Hahahahahahahah made my day




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Overcomer
02-12-2013, 03:48 PM
Haha never really give much thoughts about it. No matter how they use it, noun, verb or adjective we all get what it. :)


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Fourputt
02-12-2013, 03:49 PM
I don't golf. I play golf. Sometimes I practice golf.

You don't tennis. You don't baseball. You don't hockey. Why would you golf?

Golf has only recently become slightly accepted as a verb, and I think it just goes with the general deterioration of the English language, which goes hand in hand the decline of the education system in general. People are too lazy to learn, or they just aren't taught in school to write or speak correctly, so they don't bother. Nobody corrects them. Teachers don't seem to care any more.

Despite that, I will continue to converse, both verbally and in writing, as I was taught to to do it.

And I will continue to play golf.


Haha never really give much thoughts about it. No matter how they use it, noun, verb or adjective we all get what it. :)



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And this is the attitude which contributes to the decline.

Kobey
02-12-2013, 03:50 PM
Even more important, is golf a game or a sport?

IceyShanks
02-12-2013, 03:51 PM
I golf often.
I like to golf.

Yes.
Well put!!

huhhh
02-12-2013, 03:53 PM
I miss hockeying... haven't had the money recently.

Damaikis
02-12-2013, 03:54 PM
It's almost as versatile as the F word.

Almost... Lol

Yes, golf is a verb.

Arnold
02-12-2013, 04:42 PM
There are exception to this, particularly with the younger players. But, if I come across someone from my generation using golf as a verb, almost invariably, the person took the game up late in life and is less skilled(nothing wrong with that).
I have never heard a pro or even a golf announcer use it as a verb.

yorkem
02-12-2013, 04:49 PM
golf/gälf/



Noun


A game played on a large open-air course, in which a small hard ball is struck with a club into a series of small holes in the ground,...









Verb


Play golf.







Ok, I admit it, I googled it.

Smallville
02-12-2013, 04:56 PM
I don't golf. I play golf. Sometimes I practice golf.

You don't tennis. You don't baseball. You don't hockey. Why would you golf?

Golf has only recently become slightly accepted as a verb, and I think it just goes with the general deterioration of the English language, which goes hand in hand the decline of the education system in general. People are too lazy to learn, or they just aren't taught in school to write or speak correctly, so they don't bother. Nobody corrects them. Teachers don't seem to care any more.

Despite that, I will continue to converse, both verbally and in writing, as I was taught to to do it.

And I will continue to play golf.

And this is the attitude which contributes to the decline.
Because people who play golf are golfers, not golf players. There aren't tennisers, baseballers and hockeyers.

I golf, and I golfed the other day.

Smallville
02-12-2013, 04:57 PM
Well put!!

Or is it well PUTT?

Smallville
02-12-2013, 05:03 PM
Maybe golf can be a verb because it only has one syllable.

IceyShanks
02-12-2013, 06:01 PM
Or is it well PUTT?

Nicely done Smalls.


Siri speaks for me!

hokiegolfer
02-12-2013, 06:12 PM
I use it as both a noun and a verb, fwiw

Sighman23
02-12-2013, 06:37 PM
Someone would first need to explain to me the definition of a verb.

blugold
02-12-2013, 06:40 PM
Someone would first need to explain to me the definition of a verb.

It's a made up word.

Oregon Jack
02-12-2013, 06:42 PM
Yes it is. Or is it an adjective? I golfing hate it when my dad cuts up a perfectly good laundry basket.

TMAdidas
02-12-2013, 06:44 PM
It depends on the context. ex. I love the game of golf. It is a noun. I like to golf. It is a verb. I bought a new golf club. It is an adjective.

Jody Keith Wong
02-12-2013, 07:03 PM
It is a noun. We don't say I'm going basketballing or soccering or baseballing. We use the word golf incorrectly but who cares :)

Smallville
02-12-2013, 07:06 PM
It is a noun. We don't say I'm going basketballing or soccering or baseballing. We use the word golf incorrectly but who cares :)

As I said above, people who play golf are golfers, not golf players. There aren't basketballers, baseballers and soccerers. So playing golf or going golfing or having golfed is all OK in my book.

Oregon Jack
02-12-2013, 07:12 PM
As I said above, people who play golf are golfers, not golf players. There aren't basketballers, baseballers and soccerers. So playing golf or going golfing or having golfed is all OK in my book.

well, that gets into preferance. i used to play golf, but i got good at it and wanted to get better, and did get better, so i became a golfer.

grammatically, though, yes, it is golfer.

TripleBogieTim
02-12-2013, 07:14 PM
I know people use it as a verb, but that really does drive me nuts and is one of my pet peeves.

You don't hear pros say "I golfed really well today".

I have actually heard some say "I golfed my ball pretty good today" in interviews.

adwillingham
02-12-2013, 07:16 PM
I have actually heard some say "I golfed my ball pretty good today" in interviews.

But, but, hearing those words come out of the mouth of Boo Weekly or Bubba Watson doesn't count as them being grammatically correct :act-up:

Ndfan301
02-12-2013, 07:34 PM
Guess it depends on how your using it. Yes it's a noun in the sense of "i'm playing golf" but if you saying, "I'm golfing" it's a verb. It's one of those words where depending on how you use it, makes the English language so hard to people trying to learn it.

Remember the commercials from a couple years ago? "Verb. It's what you do!"

Fourputt
02-12-2013, 10:36 PM
Because people who play golf are golfers, not golf players. There aren't tennisers, baseballers and hockeyers.



Beg to differ. Read the rules. Player, opponent, partner, fellow competitor. Not one time is a golfer mentioned. :eyepoke:

Kobey
02-13-2013, 07:56 AM
One word- Bowler.

Kobey
02-13-2013, 08:35 AM
One word- Bowler.

I guess I should have read all new posts before posting this. Smalls beat me to it in the Rant thread. Don't you ever sleep?

JF
02-13-2013, 08:45 AM
I like to think of it as a noun. I'm in the minority though. I'd rather say "I'm going to play golf today" than "I'm going golfing today." Just sounds better to me.

jmatt
02-13-2013, 09:02 AM
Language changes and evolves, always has. I tend to use it as a noun..."I like playing golf" instead of "I like golfing". Either gets the point across.
"I golfed my ball well today" just makes me grind my teeth for some reason. I react to that like I do to "synergize" and "paradigm".

Kobey
02-13-2013, 09:22 AM
We must be some pretty lucky people when we can sit around and have a discussion on whether golf is a noun or a verb. I feel a bit better about my life today.

Hawk
02-13-2013, 09:48 AM
We must be some pretty lucky people when we can sit around and have a discussion on whether golf is a noun or a verb. I feel a bit better about my life today.


In ways agree. In others, I want to bash my head into a cactus :D

CharlieMoy
02-13-2013, 09:51 AM
When girls ask me if I'm a golfer, I respond with "yes, I play golf"

rollin
02-13-2013, 10:17 AM
technically its not averb but we often use it as such. In fact probably use enough for it to become one. I'm not sure but havn't words been added and changed and even new ones created throughout history to meet the neads of society? Good or bad IDK but words were all thought up at one time or another.
Even a past tense is often used although doesnt exist such as in. "I golffed today" Heck, I even added an "f". lol
Then there is although not correct-
"I golf'
"do you golf?"
"I would like to golf today"
"you just have to see this guy golf"
"did you golf yesterday?"
"I'm going golfing today"
"he's abetter golfer than I am"
Etc, etc, etc.......not correct but certainly spoken enough.

TahoeDust
02-14-2013, 06:20 AM
For some reason it irks me when people say golfed.

Jody Keith Wong
02-14-2013, 08:37 PM
Before I thought it was only truly a noun and we just used it as a verb in daily speech like slang.

But on second thought, I think it's an intransitive verb like age, or sleep.

giedz
02-15-2013, 06:20 PM
it has multiple uses


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