Assembling a wedge set as a new golfer

luckydutch

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I picked up golf in the middle of this year and fell in love with it. I've been obsessively practicing and taking lessons every chance I get and now that I've made some progress, I've decided to treat myself to a new set of irons as the old inherited set I play with are too short for me.

I'm going for the PXG 0211 DC irons (https://www.pxg.com/en-gb/clubs/irons/0211) in 5 through to GW. That GW is only 48 degrees though so it occurs to me that I need to think about what I want to do with wedges next.

I've only got a 54 sand wedge in this old iron set right now and truthfully, I'm not at the point yet when I would reliably know when to chip with a 50/52 vs a Sand wedge vs a Lob Wedge. Until now, the choice has generally been bump-and-run or a sand wedge chip.

Now that I'm assembling a proper set of clubs, should I be looking at buying more than one wedge? The Kirkland (Costco) wedge set looks good value and is well-reviewed. Alternatively, should I invest in just one good chipping wedge for now and look to buy the other wedges later when I've had some lessons specifically on chipping? If I do the latter, how will I learn to use the other wedges in a lesson if I don't yet have one?

I definitely cannot justify dropping £450 on three Vokeys, at least not all at once. So it'd be useful to get some guidance on how best to build that part of my bag.
 

CTRosarian

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A big factor in choosing wedges is the type of lies you hit out of. I often hit out of thick bermuda grass near the green. The grass gets a ton of water all year long.
At the end of the season when the weather gets frosty they turn on the irrigation to add more water.
 

TheDoctor

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Honestly, with the set 48° and then the 54° I would just leave it at that for the time being until you get comfortable with those

Some higher handicap players struggle with more loft, so no point making it more difficult to begin with - you can play a lot of the shots you need with the clubs you already have
Also, having the limited lofts could actually make you a better player as you could learn how to play a wider variety of shots with those 2 clubs - too many options can cause indecision
 

Sox_Fan

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Adding a 52 degree and 56 degree to the 48 GW would likely give you what you need. After you get more comfotable and experience with wedges, then you could think about adding more loft with a 60 degree. You should probably solicit the opinion of your teacher as well. We can project by what you current loft setup is, but they have seen you in action and would likely provide better insight.
 

2ndcut16

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I'd personally keep the 48*/54* and just become rock solid with those. Once you get super comfortable with those, you'll know what you like/don't like from those grinds / lofts and it will make the next decision easier. If you are practicing, you will get good at hitting different yardages (see clock method).
 

russtopher

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Honestly I'd just stick with what you have for now and work on playing various shots with them. I only had a 54* for years and I used it so much that when I added a 58*, I still went to the 54* for a lot of shots due to comfort and confidence levels. There's no hard and fast rules that you *need* to play certain lofts or for certain gaps. It all comes down to what works best for you.
 

Chef23

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I would probably go 52* and 56*. 54* wedges frequently aren't that good out of the sand. I would say you want a wedge with at least 10* of bounce although 12 would probably be better. 48, 52, 56 is plenty for now. Most golfers get themselves in trouble with 60* wedges anyway.
 

Daluteh

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Stick with what you have for now if you want. The Costco set is well reviewed and is frankly a fantastic starter kit for us high handicappers or newer golfers. They are a great starting place and I think that while you won't always use them a ton, having them at your disposal would be a good option. I have those, and they perform great for what I need them for. I'll be replacing putter next, then a hybrid/fairway and then I'll replace those wedges, but they will still get another good year out of them I bet.
 

Scooby45

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I'll echo most of the group, I think you certainly have enough to get to work. My short game got noticeably stronger when I learned how to hit various shots with the same club. 54 should give you plenty of versatility. If you play a bunch and find your self wanting more loft than you will know where to move.
 

ttucliffhanger

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Adding a 52 degree and 56 degree to the 48 GW would likely give you what you need. After you get more comfotable and experience with wedges, then you could think about adding more loft with a 60 degree. You should probably solicit the opinion of your teacher as well. We can project by what you current loft setup is, but they have seen you in action and would likely provide better insight.
This. and use what you are comfortable with and can score with. Don't buy a wedge just to fill a spot because if you can't hit it or it doesn't serve a purpose, you are just wasting a spot in the bag.
 

*Range Rat

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So it'd be useful to get some guidance on how best to build that part of my bag.
First off, don't think you must have a bag full of wedges. You don't. Simplicity is the key. I've learned in my 4 decades plus of golf that all you really need is 2 wedges. I can play any shot (with a wedge) that i'm faced with during a round with either my Pw or Sw. They are versatile clubs and can be used in several situations if you practice with them and make them your short game weapons like i have. Making things more complicated than they have to be is a big problem amongst recreational hdcp golfers today imo. Remember - Simplicity is key :cool:
 

luckydutch

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Honestly, with the set 48° and then the 54° I would just leave it at that for the time being until you get comfortable with those

Some higher handicap players struggle with more loft, so no point making it more difficult to begin with - you can play a lot of the shots you need with the clubs you already have
Also, having the limited lofts could actually make you a better player as you could learn how to play a wider variety of shots with those 2 clubs - too many options can cause indecision
Thanks for the quick response there.

Is there any reason the SW from the old inherited set wouldn't be fine to use?

I felt I really need to replace the irons as they're nearly an inch too short for me with the wrong lie and shaft stiffness so I felt an immediate and huge difference when swinging better fit irons. I guess a lot of that is less relevant with a chipping wedge though?

I try (if I can) to avoid ever having an approach shot that's shorter than 120 because I don't like swinging the SW full (I seem to get a large variance on distance with it - can go anywhere between 50 and 90 yards on a seemingly clean strike depending on the lie etc.) and I HATE partial swings. I want to be swinging full or chipping, not between.
 

Snowman

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I'd agree with those saying to add a 52° and 56°, and IMO the 56° should have a versatile grind that allows you to open the face when you need to. Number one, you really need that shot sometimes, and number two, practicing those kind of shots is fun! Not saying a beginner should be trying to hit full-on flop shots, but learning to bring the ball in high and soft, or hit those delicate little greenside chips out of rough can save you strokes.
 

Scooby45

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First off, don't think you must have a bag full of wedges. You don't. Simplicity is the key. I've learned in my 4 decades plus of golf that all you really need is 2 wedges. I can play any shot (with a wedge) that i'm faced with during a round with either my Pw or Sw. They are versatile clubs and can be used in several situations if you practice with them and make them your short game weapons like i have. Making things more complicated than they have to be is a big problem amongst recreational hdcp golfers today imo. Remember - Simplicity is key :cool:
I fully agree in that simplicity can be key and also you can get by with two wedges.

However, a counterpoint could be made that say four wedges allows you to have consistency and a simple approach. You can use the same swing (simple) with four different lofts to achieve four different outcomes around the green.

Not saying one is better than the other, but there can be multiple ways to approach keeping the game simple.
 

TxAggie2018

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If you hate partial swings, I can't see you being happy with a 2 wedge setup that would require you to make feel shots constantly.

A 4 wedge setup would ask you to learn a stock half-swing, but with that you have the gapping to hit anything within 100 yards easily. Oftentimes you end up with more than 1 option to get there.
 
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Popeye

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As a new golfer less is more. As in less clubs in the bag. Keeping with that PXG set will allow you to get good at the supplied wedge. Having 3 wedges in the bag as a beginner is more of a hindrance than a help.
Keep it simple.

Sent from my SM-G998U using Tapatalk
 

MGoBlue

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Wait, there are folks on this forum telling someone NOT to buy clubs???? 🤣

There are pros and cons to all the approaches and reasons given here so far. I’ll add that if the inherited wedge is very old, chances are that the grooves are shot. A new wedge or set with sharp grooves should provide better outcomes around the green on chips and short pitches. I personally think the Costco option is a good one. Lots of practice with the different options with those would be the fastest way to lower scores and handicap.
 

luckydutch

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As a new golfer less is more. As in less clubs in the bag. Keeping with that PXG set will allow you to get good at the supplied wedge. Having 3 wedges in the bag as a beginner is more of a hindrance than a help.
Keep it simple.

Sent from my SM-G998U using Tapatalk
The highest loft wedge I am buying from that set is a 48 Gap Wedge, though.

I think I will need at least one wedge with more loft than that.

The sensible options is see at the moment are:

#1 Stick with the current sand wedge I have from the inherited set until I get better

#2 Buy (new or used) a single wedge around 54-56 degrees to use for chipping and approach shots too short for the 48 GW

#3 Buy the attractively-priced Kirkland set that runs 52-56-60. I may want to extend the shafts and regrip them at some point

My natural inclination as a chronic saver is to go with option 1 but I’ve got people nagging me for Christmas present ideas plus I so rarely spend money on myself so I do have the means to go with option 2 or 3 if they’re better long-term choices.
 

luckydutch

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Wait, there are folks on this forum telling someone NOT to buy clubs????

There are pros and cons to all the approaches and reasons given here so far. I’ll add that if the inherited wedge is very old, chances are that the grooves are shot. A new wedge or set with sharp grooves should provide better outcomes around the green on chips and short pitches. I personally think the Costco option is a good one. Lots of practice with the different options with those would be the fastest way to lower scores and handicap.
I think the grooves on it are OK actually. Sadly, I don’t think my grandad got to use these clubs much after he bought them before he passed away. They seemed to have gathered more wear in the 6 months I have been using them than they had when I got them.

That being said, they’re all about an inch short for me (including the wedge) and too flat on the lie angle.

For chipping alone, the old SW is probably OK. I don’t really like it for full shots, though. I feel it has the biggest carry variance of any of my irons and the toe tends to dig into the turf, particularly on the muddier lies I’ve experience since it turned winter.
 

CTRosarian

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I've effectively used my sand wedge for approach shots within 40 ft.
Muddy lies take a lot of skill and/or luck. One of my best shots was hitting off packed mud to 8 feet from the hole. How much the mud will grab the club is unpredictable.

When hitting off rough near the green you need to read the grain of the grass. The club travels much easier in one direction than the other. At least with the bermuda grass around the greens of my golf course. The type of grass makes a big difference, or so I've been told. I'll always played on bermuda grass. Since I learned to read bermuda greens as a kid I can make a good guess with a quick eyeball of the green.

Used ladies wedges and irons are usually a good deal as far as face wear goes. I've bought ladies clubs with nearly pristine faces. I think it is the combination of slower swing speeds, softer balls, and less aggressive play that keeps them in near new condition. The grips often need replacing.
 
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Scorpion12

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5 21°
6 24°
7 28°
8 32°
9 37°
W 42°
G 48°

Notice the loft... 3* between 5 and 6, 4* between 6-8, 5* between 9-W, and 6* between W-G.

And you're wanting to keep a SW that's too short, has the wrong lie?

I'd recommend you get something in maybe in the low 50's like a 52* or so and a new SW in 56* or 58* that is already at at the length and lie you need. While the Costco wedges are well reviewed, you're saying they're not ideal for you either... You're planning on regripping and extending the shaft length in the future? Get something that's already what you're looking for.

They don't have to be brand spanking new Vokey SM8's or SM9's either. You can find something from Cleveland that's still got the plastic on the head of say a CBX2... or if you're wanting more of a bladey wedge style and less of a cavity back, look at Cleveland's RTX4.

Or Callaway Pre Owned has several Mack Daddy wedges for $85 US give or take a couple of dollars.

Or there's BudgetGolf. They've got several brands to choose from including Cleveland SmartSoles... the SmartSole S is reviewed out to be almost a cheat code for getting out of the sand traps... don't open your stance. Don't open the club face. Swing normally. Ball comes out.

Lots of options for wedges are available.

PING Glide
Callaway Mack Daddy or JAWS or Sure Out or PM Grind
Titleist Vokey
Cleveland RTX Zipcore, RTX4, CBX2, Smart Sole
Ben Hogan Equalizer
Cobra

ebay lists several wedges too...
Callaway Mack Daddy 5 54* and 58* wedge set for $103 with stiff shafts
Cleveland CBX2 Black Satin 50* 54* 58* set for $118 New still in the wrapper.
Cleveland CBX2 chrome 52* 56* 60* set for $152 New still in the wrapper

And the CBX2 is a more forgiving wedge than the Kirkland brand. I've got a CBX2 and an RTX4. The CBX2 is much more forgiving for my game than the RTX4 is.
 

luckydutch

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5 21°
6 24°
7 28°
8 32°
9 37°
W 42°
G 48°

Notice the loft... 3* between 5 and 6, 4* between 6-8, 5* between 9-W, and 6* between W-G.

And you're wanting to keep a SW that's too short, has the wrong lie?

I'd recommend you get something in maybe in the low 50's like a 52* or so and a new SW in 56* or 58* that is already at at the length and lie you need. While the Costco wedges are well reviewed, you're saying they're not ideal for you either... You're planning on regripping and extending the shaft length in the future? Get something that's already what you're looking for.

They don't have to be brand spanking new Vokey SM8's or SM9's either. You can find something from Cleveland that's still got the plastic on the head of say a CBX2... or if you're wanting more of a bladey wedge style and less of a cavity back, look at Cleveland's RTX4.

Or Callaway Pre Owned has several Mack Daddy wedges for $85 US give or take a couple of dollars.

Or there's BudgetGolf. They've got several brands to choose from including Cleveland SmartSoles... the SmartSole S is reviewed out to be almost a cheat code for getting out of the sand traps... don't open your stance. Don't open the club face. Swing normally. Ball comes out.

Lots of options for wedges are available.

PING Glide
Callaway Mack Daddy or JAWS or Sure Out or PM Grind
Titleist Vokey
Cleveland RTX Zipcore, RTX4, CBX2, Smart Sole
Ben Hogan Equalizer
Cobra

ebay lists several wedges too...
Callaway Mack Daddy 5 54* and 58* wedge set for $103 with stiff shafts
Cleveland CBX2 Black Satin 50* 54* 58* set for $118 New still in the wrapper.
Cleveland CBX2 chrome 52* 56* 60* set for $152 New still in the wrapper

And the CBX2 is a more forgiving wedge than the Kirkland brand. I've got a CBX2 and an RTX4. The CBX2 is much more forgiving for my game than the RTX4 is.
Yes, that's the big disadvantage I see with sticking with the current SW. That PXG GW is likely to be a 120 yard carry club for me and my SW is more like 80 and can often come up short of that. A 40+ yard gap on approaches has the potential to be costly.

I live in the UK so a few of those stores you mentioned don't operate here and the 2nd hand market is wildly over-inflated right now. That said, we do have callaway preowned and I hear nothing but good things about their quality and service. Might have to stalk that site and see whether any wedges in my specs come up.

Still slightly tempted by the costco wedges. I could extend and regrip them and it still come in at about £70 per wedge.
 

TheDoctor

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Didn't realise you were in the UK, but have you checked out the Clubhouse Golf site? They have the Cleveland RTX3 for £79 or the CBX2 for £109 and a few other options

If you go secondhand, you might find something in exactly the specs you want, but what condition will the grooves be in? If you go new off a site like above, you might not get the exact specs you want but you will be getting a new wedge
The only other option is to try and find a fitter that can work with you to get the specs you want for a previous generation wedge to try and save you some cash

Another site you could maybe try is Golfbidder - they will likely have a large amount of stock to choose from
 

*Range Rat

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That PXG GW is likely to be a 120 yard carry club for me and my SW is more like 80 and can often come up short of that. A 40+ yard gap on approaches has the potential to be costly.
I'm sure you are aware that you can use your 120 carry club for shots less than that. With practice you can learn to hit it 110, 100, 90, etc. That's what i do with my PW (hit it on shots anywhere from its full carry distance down to 40 or 50 yds less than that). I've made my PW a very versatile short game weapon with a little practice.
 
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RatFink

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I think you have a fun opportunity ahead of you.
Many of us hackers went straight to buying a dedicated sand wedge and lob wedge and couldn't hit them for years - only to see a slew of videos these days suggesting that maybe we shouldn't always be reaching for them around the green, and should consider 7i-PW for chip shots.

You have the opportunity to get really good at these shots and then see where you struggle with regards to maybe getting the ball up and over obstacles like bunkers or other things like that.

I would not go straight to buying a 58/60 with the lust of being able to flop like Phil. It just won't happen - there's a good chance you may end up thinning 100 good opportunities across the green instead of doing a more sensible shot.
 

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