liquidcowboy

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Have a question for any hikers/campers on here. I am heading out to Utah this summer for some hiking/climbing/rafting, and wanted to see what everyone has as their must have/carry items in their pack for day hikes and overnight hikes for safety/survival and any comfort items.
 

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Have you done overnights in the backcountry before?
 

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Have a question for any hikers/campers on here. I am heading out to Utah this summer for some hiking/climbing/rafting, and wanted to see what everyone has as their must have/carry items in their pack for day hikes and overnight hikes for safety/survival and any comfort items.
Water, water, and more water. Its very dry out here so it tends to evaporate right out of you instead of sweating. Easy to get dehydrated quickly and not realize it.

High energy snacks like granola and trail mix are a very good idea as well as a small shovel or some other tool should you need to get out of a bind.

Thinking isn't my strong suit today so if anything else pops in my head, I'll let ya know.

Where are you heading? I recommend the Canyonlands. Just as awesome as Moab but without the crowds.
 

liquidcowboy

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Have you done overnights in the backcountry before?
Not in this type of backcountry. All my overnights have been mostly in the woods in central and north Florida. This is my first time out west for outdoor activities besides snowboarding.
 

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It's been awhile, but I'll try to remember some things. I used to do a lot of backcountry hikes out west. Remember the name of the game is saving weight, so it's sometimes worth spending a few extra bucks on a lighter version of an item. I assume you have a good pack, but if not don't skimp on it. An uncomfortable, fully loaded pack SUCKS. Also if you don't have good boots broke in get to it.

Get a solid first aid kit if you don't have one. Might be worth having some basic meds as well - benedryl, anti-diarhea, tylenol, etc. Some sort of blister treatment. Tape, etc.

Definitey scope out what water you will have available to you. In a perfect world you will have plenty of it at your disposal and won't have to carry a lot with you, but it'll depend on where you're hiking. If you're doing this as a short term thing and don't want to spend a bunch of money you can get away with iodine tablets to purify water cheaply, but they are kinda gross. Otherwise, buy a good bottle and then filter that will prevent giardia. Do not mess with water that hasn't been purified.

Lighter and waterproof matches as a backup.

emergency blanket.

Depends on how cold it gets there at night, but you'll want a good sleeping bag. In the mountains I bought one that was rated down to 20° or so I believe.

Also depends on the night temps, but a stocking cap is nice if it's going to be chilly when you're sleeping. Warm body and cold head still equals cold.

A sleeping pad is bulky, but a nice luxury.

Toilet paper. Unroll it and fold it up. Put it in a baggy.

Extra Socks.

Small butane camp stove and a camp pot. I'd just buy freeze dried food. Add water and voila - food. Plastic utensils will work fine. Some sort of snack high in calories. Trail mix basically.

Plastic baggies are great for all kinds of things. Trash, organizing, waterproofing.

Not sure how you're navigating, but I did it the old fashioned way with a decent compass.

There's a start.
 

^dub^

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Everything Hawk said plus CHECK THE FORECAST! Summer hiking in Utah with sudden flash floods is a killer.

Plus have fun! I did Canyonlands and Arches a couple years ago, but I went in Feb. with a good week of 55 highs and 25 lows and had the whole place to myself it seemed.
That's my best hiking advice, hike in the off season when there's no crowds. Hard to plan I know, but the payoff is glorious. I did the Grand Canyon the same way a few years ago in the first week of December. Nobody around. Imagine how amazing that place is just hiking/standing/sitting on the edge by yourself for three days!
 

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Hawk makes some great recommendations here. I'll add a few things based on my experiences in Utah and the Pacific Northwest:

-Something to keep you dry if rain hits - and it can hit quite suddenly and intensely in the desert, if briefly. A rain poncho or ultralight packable rain jacket will do the trick.
-Dress in LAYERS. Temperatures change rapidly in the desert, plus you can be prepared for more varied temperatures carrying less this way. Follow the base layer-insulating layer-wind/waterproof layer mantra.
-Protect yourself from the sun, it gets intense at altitude. Sunscreen or long sleeves, and a good hat (bucket or something else with a lot of coverage is best).

Utah is awesome, you're gonna love it!

It's been awhile, but I'll try to remember some things. I used to do a lot of backcountry hikes out west. Remember the name of the game is saving weight, so it's sometimes worth spending a few extra bucks on a lighter version of an item. I assume you have a good pack, but if not don't skimp on it. An uncomfortable, fully loaded pack SUCKS. Also if you don't have good boots broke in get to it.

Get a solid first aid kit if you don't have one. Might be worth having some basic meds as well - benedryl, anti-diarhea, tylenol, etc. Some sort of blister treatment. Tape, etc.

Definitey scope out what water you will have available to you. In a perfect world you will have plenty of it at your disposal and won't have to carry a lot with you, but it'll depend on where you're hiking. If you're doing this as a short term thing and don't want to spend a bunch of money you can get away with iodine tablets to purify water cheaply, but they are kinda gross. Otherwise, buy a good bottle and then filter that will prevent giardia. Do not mess with water that hasn't been purified.

Lighter and waterproof matches as a backup.

emergency blanket.

Depends on how cold it gets there at night, but you'll want a good sleeping bag. In the mountains I bought one that was rated down to 20° or so I believe.

Also depends on the night temps, but a stocking cap is nice if it's going to be chilly when you're sleeping. Warm body and cold head still equals cold.

A sleeping pad is bulky, but a nice luxury.

Toilet paper. Unroll it and fold it up. Put it in a baggy.

Extra Socks.

Small butane camp stove and a camp pot. I'd just buy freeze dried food. Add water and voila - food. Plastic utensils will work fine. Some sort of snack high in calories. Trail mix basically.

Plastic baggies are great for all kinds of things. Trash, organizing, waterproofing.

Not sure how you're navigating, but I did it the old fashioned way with a decent compass.

There's a start.
 

Hawk

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I also carried a fly rod inside a tube and used it as a walking stick. If you're a fisherman.

Oh, and cards if you have a partner. Or something to do.
Flashlight is nice. Maybe a couple extra batteries.
 

liquidcowboy

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Thanks for the advice guys. I picked up a camelback bladder to go in my pack, so hopefully that will be easier than carrying water bottles. I am looking forward to this trip. Going to be in Canyonlands, Arches, and the La Sal Mountains for a week.
 

Hawk

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Man that is going to be a badass trip dude.

Stay hydrated and be a little conservative with your plans and miles per day. Especially if it's at elevation. I pushed too hard when I visited after moving back to the midwest and ended up pretty sick during my hike, but I was at 7000-8000 feet. That's a pretty rotten situation to be in.
 

liquidcowboy

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Man that is going to be a badass trip dude.

Stay hydrated and be a little conservative with your plans and miles per day. Especially if it's at elevation. I pushed too hard when I visited after moving back to the midwest and ended up pretty sick during my hike, but I was at 7000-8000 feet. That's a pretty rotten situation to be in.
Yea, I reserved one day while I am in Moab to rent a Jeep and do some rock trails. Had to cancel my annual summer golf trip for this one, but I think it is going to be well worth it.
 

^dub^

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Utah really is amazing. Topographically speaking, that is.
 

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Basic emergency kit:
Emergency blanket, whistle, compass, mirror, 1st aid kit, condoms (they are small but hold a ton of water in an emergency), iodine tablets, some method for making fire (veteran tip here - Fritos have so much oil in them they make great tinder), map, cell phone

Here's my Utah tip - chill out and take it easy driving. I've never encountered so many true asshats on the road as last year in Utah backcountry / parks.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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