Just had a lesson with Mike Adams, Top 5 golf instructor

Colbalt

scc13

Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2017
Messages
46
Reaction score
1
Location
Bay Area
Handicap
12.2
Just found this 90 minute video with Mike Adams and Terry Rowles and it was very interesting indeed.


Apparently after testing and measuring 90+ pga tour pros through their systems they found a cause and effect of why PGA Pros swing the way they do. It all seems to be related to body part 'shape/length/flexibility' . He also shows in detail the swing patterns for many PGA Pro golfers providing a reason for their backswing and downswing planes and how they pivot . Posture and setup (unique to the golfers body) seems to be of ultimate importance in dictating the dynamics of the swing.

They found one third of golfers they measured pivoted on their lead leg , another third pivoted centrally , and yet another third pivoted on their rear leg all (each type of pivot will have different lower body biomechanics).

I wish the other follow-up episodes were free to view as they get into more detail about how the grip can change your swing action.
There is a decent amount of info if you hunt a little bit. They are done with writing a book, but just are editing it, so it will definitely help.

On Instagram, both Terry and Mike have decent content. Check out Kelan McDonough's Instagram too - he is Mike's assistant and has been generous with his time answering some questions via DM. Terry Pilkadaris, Tina Tombs, Doug Spencer are all great follows too as far as related content.

Also, if you have YoutubeTV, check out the Chris Como swing expedition with Terry - that could help too.
 

WILDTHING

Active member
Joined
Sep 16, 2018
Messages
531
Reaction score
184
Handicap
15
I've done a bit of searching and there are some old (but I suspect applicable) videos where Mike Adams uses something called the 'Laws of Golf'


According to these tests I am a 'Width' golfer so here is the follow-up video.


There are videos for the leverage and arc type players too

The LAWs of the Golf Swing: Leverage Player - YouTube
The LAWs of the Golf Swing: Arc Player - YouTube

I think he's got the physics wrong about transfer of energy in the 'width' video ( not had time to view leverage and arc yet) but it does seem to make some sense regarding body limitations in trying increase the hand path in the different axis (back, in , up). Not sure about foot flare because excessive foot flare in the lead foot will restrict pelvic rotation in the backswing and vice versa (probably need to find the correct balance).

It almost seems that he is advocating a 'functional pull' type swing for the width player , basically accommodating an OTT move by closing the stance and adjusting the ball position.
 

scc13

Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2017
Messages
46
Reaction score
1
Location
Bay Area
Handicap
12.2
I've done a bit of searching and there are some old (but I suspect applicable) videos where Mike Adams uses something called the 'Laws of Golf'


According to these tests I am a 'Width' golfer so here is the follow-up video.


There are videos for the leverage and arc type players too

The LAWs of the Golf Swing: Leverage Player - YouTube
The LAWs of the Golf Swing: Arc Player - YouTube

I think he's got the physics wrong about transfer of energy in the 'width' video ( not had time to view leverage and arc yet) but it does seem to make some sense regarding body limitations in trying increase the hand path in the different axis (back, in , up). Not sure about foot flare because excessive foot flare in the lead foot will restrict pelvic rotation in the backswing and vice versa (probably need to find the correct balance).

It almost seems that he is advocating a 'functional pull' type swing for the width player , basically accommodating an OTT move by closing the stance and adjusting the ball position.
What did you test out as in his new methodology? Trail arm, Wingspan v height, which post?
 

WILDTHING

Active member
Joined
Sep 16, 2018
Messages
531
Reaction score
184
Handicap
15
What did you test out as in his new methodology? Trail arm, Wingspan v height, which post?
I'll need to search the template out as I filed it somewhere on my old computer (I did this back in 2012). Once I find the template , I'll attach it.
 

WILDTHING

Active member
Joined
Sep 16, 2018
Messages
531
Reaction score
184
Handicap
15
I found my old test measurements and a template you can use to test out yourself (it's an incredible number of tests and measurements).

My biomechanical swing pattern is:

ACCURACY

a. SWING PATH
- That my swing path in the takeaway/delivery is termed 'SIDE-ON' (meaning my dominant forearm is aligned more sideways than pointing up to the sky or down to the ground).
TEST: The plane and path your clubhead travels on during your backswing.
Up and In :Elbow folds along the spine angle -Side On Golfers
Hold shoulders and make triangle in front of body with arms. Next neutralize the shoulders and allow arms to swing back.This will determine the best position for your trail elbow at address - for me it will be at the hip.

6th Nov 2016 - changed from MID to HIGH TRACK.
b. SWING TRACK - I am HIGH-TRACK - This is how my elbows move in relation to my torso as well as how my dominant arm folds to support leverage in my backswing. Basically my lead arm stretches upwards above shoulder line at the top of the backswing (ie. 2 plane).
TEST: To determine the ideal path on which you should swing , in most cases, the plane on which you should deliver the club into the ball, regardless if your motion is rotary or lateral
#1 ___ ” Knuckle to Elbow measurement < > =
#2 ___” Elbow to shoulder measurement
If #1 < #2 use the low track plane
If #1 = #2 use the mid track or turned shoulder plane
If #1 > #2 use the high track plane
For me 1 = 39 cms , 2=32 cms
I should be HIGH TRACK

NOTE : 1ST NOV 2016 - Got my original measurements wrong 1=39, 2=32.

c. WRIST LEVER ACTION - unsure about this one , but if I use a stronger grip at adress, and hinge my wrists horizontally , I feel as if I don't have to consciously roll my forearms in the backswing. Therefore I regard myself as a having a HORIZONTAL WRIST LEVER ACTION.
Test: When using the various wrist hinge methods , vertical, diagonal, horizontal - ask someone to apply downward pressure. Your wrist lever position is the one that is structurally stronger against this push down.
Note: The grip by the dominant hand (in my case it will be right hand even though I am a lefty) must match your wrist lever action to ensure no rotation of left forearm.

d. LEVER DELIVERY ACTION - Describes how the system of leverage unfolds to release the strokes energy. I have a CORNERING LEVER DELIVERY ACTION - meaning that when the butt of my club is pointing more towards the ball, the right arm begins straightening while wrist lever maintained but the path is more of an arc inside-inside and I achieve extension about 45 degrees past impact.
Cornering = Side-on alignment = Full extension or aim point of trail arm at 45 degrees and slight bend at the finish
Drill- Make naval high back swing and swing through to your follow-through producing 30-50 yard shots. Drill the feeling of where your arms become straight.
Exercise- 10lb. Medicine ball fold with side cover action and throws so arms extend at 45 degrees across the body

POWER

a. SWING ANCHOR
- Definitely more balanced in my swing if I'm anchored CENTRE-REAR - So I will set up at address favouring a little more weight on my right leg. If I addressed 50-50 , then my body will tend to drift laterally in the backstroke to stay in balance. This drift would be worse if I set up favouring weight on the front leg at address. My ball position will be dependent on how I set up at address so its important that I 'dial' into my correct SWING-ANCHOR point to then predict my ball position using maybe PMD (Perpetual Motion Drill swings) around that SWING-ANCHOR point.
TEST FOR REAR SWING ANCHOR: I lose balance and fall backwards when I try to complete the follow-through using the one-legged drill on my lead leg. I am in balance when I do the one-legged drill on my rear leg. I can also follow-through properly if I swing left handed (I am a lefty playing right handed). When I do the feet together drill I can strike the ball better but there is still a slight drift backwards to stay in balance. This is why I think I am CENTRE-REAR.

I've attached a template that shows the full tests but these may have changed since I found them on the internet
 

Attachments

scc13

Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2017
Messages
46
Reaction score
1
Location
Bay Area
Handicap
12.2
Super helpful note and template.

I am Rear Post, On Top golfer. I have longer arms than height, and longer forearm than upper arm. Additionally, I have a ton of external shoulder rotation. With all of that - my comp is probably Wolff or Garcia. Vijay and CMontgomery were also mentioned.

I have historically always hit a draw, but they want me (given above) to hit release fades - so I am really struggling with that new pattern. Additionally, I should have some counter-tilt in my backswing - also a new feel.
 

WILDTHING

Active member
Joined
Sep 16, 2018
Messages
531
Reaction score
184
Handicap
15
Super helpful note and template.

I am Rear Post, On Top golfer. I have longer arms than height, and longer forearm than upper arm. Additionally, I have a ton of external shoulder rotation. With all of that - my comp is probably Wolff or Garcia. Vijay and CMontgomery were also mentioned.

I have historically always hit a draw, but they want me (given above) to hit release fades - so I am really struggling with that new pattern. Additionally, I should have some counter-tilt in my backswing - also a new feel.
I've also found another video which I think explains some more of the logic behind these tests but you will need to view it via the Vimeo site.

 

WILDTHING

Active member
Joined
Sep 16, 2018
Messages
531
Reaction score
184
Handicap
15
Here is another link providing even more explanations.

BioSwingDynamics (newhorizonsgolf.com)

After looking at the force plate pattern graphs , I think I'm starting to understand about Gliders/Spinners/Launchers and how they power their swings and time their release.

I also now understand what Mike Adams means with regards vertical/diagonal/horizontal wrist hinge patterns.

I can also imagine that their theories are not 100% complete and that its 'work in progress' which may produce more tests to accurately define what optimal biomechanics each golfer should use to match their bodies.
 

GolfLivesMatter

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 24, 2018
Messages
3,216
Reaction score
1,009
Location
Newport Beach
Handicap
36
This is interesting but I'm trying to figure out why Nicklaus had a flying right elbow and Hogan kept his elbow pointed down. Was this due to body type, and/or measurements?....meaning did Nicklaus have to have a flying right elbow or was that simply a preference for him to generate right arm power?
 

WILDTHING

Active member
Joined
Sep 16, 2018
Messages
531
Reaction score
184
Handicap
15
This is interesting but I'm trying to figure out why Nicklaus had a flying right elbow and Hogan kept his elbow pointed down. Was this due to body type, and/or measurements?....meaning did Nicklaus have to have a flying right elbow or was that simply a preference for him to generate right arm power?
Actually one of the Mike Adams videos I've seen mentioned about Jack and Hogan body profile types ( I'll post a link when I identify which one)
 

GolfLivesMatter

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 24, 2018
Messages
3,216
Reaction score
1,009
Location
Newport Beach
Handicap
36
Actually one of the Mike Adams videos I've seen mentioned about Jack and Hogan body profile types ( I'll post a link when I identify which one)
That would be interesting. Adams shows BDC as being a left post player. I have read elsewhere about these measurements and found discussions about Nicklaus having an upright swing because he was a bigger kid when he started playing golf. However, as Jack aged he didn't adjust his swing path after trimming down. BDC's build is very similar to "old Jack" yet BDC is left post and Jack was right post. This is where this gets confusing for me.
 

GolfLivesMatter

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 24, 2018
Messages
3,216
Reaction score
1,009
Location
Newport Beach
Handicap
36
Correcting myself. After a review of Jack's position at the top, he was more towards a center-left-post because his butt traveled about 4 inches towards the target while progressing to the top of his backswing, plus, his left knee moved downward indicating weight transfer onto his lead foot. Then on his downswing, his left hips traveled another 4 or so inches towards the target. Very similar to Hogan who had a flat backswing, and Hogan's hip movement towards the target on the backswing was more than Jack's.

Oddly enough, both advocated a rightward weight shift upon the takeaway, but ultimately both of them transferred a lot of weight to their lead side at the top with their lower body shifts towards the target. Therefore, I question if measuring someone is more of an adjunct to a good club fitting session vs ensuring someone is executing these types of movements. That said, whatever works, and is consistently repeatable is always the goal.
 

Attachments

WILDTHING

Active member
Joined
Sep 16, 2018
Messages
531
Reaction score
184
Handicap
15
Correcting myself. After a review of Jack's position at the top, he was more towards a center-left-post because his butt traveled about 4 inches towards the target while progressing to the top of his backswing, plus, his left knee moved downward indicating weight transfer onto his lead foot. Then on his downswing, his left hips traveled another 4 or so inches towards the target. Very similar to Hogan who had a flat backswing, and Hogan's hip movement towards the target on the backswing was more than Jack's.

Oddly enough, both advocated a rightward weight shift upon the takeaway, but ultimately both of them transferred a lot of weight to their lead side at the top with their lower body shifts towards the target. Therefore, I question if measuring someone is more of an adjunct to a good club fitting session vs ensuring someone is executing these types of movements. That said, whatever works, and is consistently repeatable is always the goal.
As far as a I am aware golfers who are primarily 'Gliders' are usually 2 post golfers who pivots on their rear leg in the backswing and glide over to pivot on their front leg in the early downswing. Basically pushing the right leg laterally into the ground away from the target to assist them in developing the forces/torques they require to create the movements to power and square their golf club. I think in the late downswing , the legs are pushing targetwards into the ground.

Golfers who are 'Launchers' are front post and primarily use launch (vertical) ground reaction forces where they pivot over the lead leg in both backswing and downswing (not much lateral or spin involved). So they are flexing their lead knee more in the backswing to enable them to push up early enough in the downswing to assist them in developing the forces/torques required to create the movements to power and square their golf club (this type of ground reaction force is what SnT golfers use).

Golfers with fast hips who pivot around both hips creating a virtual pelvic centre of rotation are primarily spinners who create larger than average torque type ground reaction forces to help them in developing the forces/torques they require to create the movements to power and square their golf club.

This is what Mike Adams said about Jack and Ben

Jack Nicklaus - is mainly a 'Glider /Launcher' with some 'Spin' . Basically he uses lots of lateral movement to move his 'pressure load' back from the rear to an increasingly loaded front leg so that he can then launch upwards. I think he is categorised as a 'Double Dipper' who uses mainly 2 elements of ground reaction forces to assist the powering of his golf swing

Ben Hogan - Front post 'Spinner/Launcher', so basically pivots around is lead leg but has moderately fast hips and moderately launches (so not much glide happening).

I think I'll await the production of the 'Mike Adams/Terry Rowles' book and then read Dr Jeff Mann's detailed analysis (he's got the anatomical expertise while I might assist in trying to understand any physics involved).

Here are some Glider force plate graphs

1621297129206.png

Here are some Spinner force plate graphs

1621297292478.png

Here are some Launcher force plate graphs (ie. Lexi Thompson and Bubba Watson are 'Launchers' ).


1621297479964.png
 
Last edited:

GolfLivesMatter

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 24, 2018
Messages
3,216
Reaction score
1,009
Location
Newport Beach
Handicap
36
As far as a I am aware golfers who are primarily 'Gliders' are usually 2 post golfers who pivots on their rear leg in the backswing and glide over to pivot on their front leg in the early downswing. Basically pushing the right leg laterally into the ground away from the target to assist them in developing the forces/torques they require to create the movements to power and square their golf club. I think in the late downswing , the legs are pushing targetwards into the ground.

Golfers who are 'Launchers' are front post and primarily use launch (vertical) ground reaction forces where they pivot over the lead leg in both backswing and downswing (not much lateral or spin involved). So they are flexing their lead knee more in the backswing to enable them to push up early enough in the downswing to assist them in developing the forces/torques required to create the movements to power and square their golf club (this type of ground reaction force is what SnT golfers use).

Golfers with fast hips who pivot around both hips creating a virtual pelvic centre of rotation are primarily spinners who create larger than average torque type ground reaction forces to help them in developing the forces/torques they require to create the movements to power and square their golf club.

This is what Mike Adams said about Jack and Ben

Jack Nicklaus - is mainly a 'Glider /Launcher' with some 'Spin' . Basically he uses lots of lateral movement to move his 'pressure load' back from the rear to an increasingly loaded front leg so that he can then launch upwards. I think he is categorised as a 'Double Dipper' who uses mainly 2 elements of ground reaction forces to assist the powering of his golf swing

Ben Hogan - Front post 'Spinner/Launcher', so basically pivots around is lead leg but has moderately fast hips and moderately launches (so not much glide happening).

I think I'll await the production of the 'Mike Adams/Terry Rowles' book and then read Dr Jeff Mann's detailed analysis (he's got the anatomical expertise while I might assist in trying to understand any physics involved).

Here are some Glider force plate graphs

View attachment 9008332

Here are some Spinner force plate graphs

View attachment 9008333

Here are some Launcher force plate graphs (ie. Lexi Thompson and Bubba Watson are 'Launchers' ).


View attachment 9008334
Interesting....thanks for the info. When I watch videos of Hogan's lower body during his backswing, his butt moved toward the target about 4 to 5 inches, and on the downswing, his butt continued to move an additional 5-6 inches (estimate) towards the target, which resulted in his belt buckle clearly being the closest item to the target. This is fundamental in SnT, at least with my instructor, books, videos, etc. Plus, I can't think of a tour pro whose belt buckle isn't the closest item to the target post-impact. In Bennett and Plummer's book, they talk about feeling like the right pocket is passing by the ball on the downswing. After seeing Hogan's video I understand that feeling.

It's quite clear Hogan's and Nicklaus's teachings about turning into the right side were both true...and not really false...but misleading....because they both ultimately, in varying degrees, quickly transferred whatever weight they shifted to their right side back to their lead side early in the backswing. Jack appeared to have had somewhat less loading on his lead side, but nonetheless, they both pre-loaded onto their lead sides before they initiated their downswings. IMO Jack's left heel lift confused people to believe their weight should be on, or over their right knee at the top when clearly that was not how his swing progressed.
 
Last edited:

GolfLivesMatter

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 24, 2018
Messages
3,216
Reaction score
1,009
Location
Newport Beach
Handicap
36
I wanted to add that this is a very good thought-provoking thread. Well done OP.
 

WILDTHING

Active member
Joined
Sep 16, 2018
Messages
531
Reaction score
184
Handicap
15
Correcting myself. After a review of Jack's position at the top, he was more towards a center-left-post because his butt traveled about 4 inches towards the target while progressing to the top of his backswing, plus, his left knee moved downward indicating weight transfer onto his lead foot. Then on his downswing, his left hips traveled another 4 or so inches towards the target. Very similar to Hogan who had a flat backswing, and Hogan's hip movement towards the target on the backswing was more than Jack's.

Oddly enough, both advocated a rightward weight shift upon the takeaway, but ultimately both of them transferred a lot of weight to their lead side at the top with their lower body shifts towards the target. Therefore, I question if measuring someone is more of an adjunct to a good club fitting session vs ensuring someone is executing these types of movements. That said, whatever works, and is consistently repeatable is always the goal.

Here is a birds eye view of Jack Nicklaus . At the top of the backswing his right butt cheek is on the 'Tush Line' and by the time his left arm becomes parallel to the ground in the downswing he hasn't actively moved his pelvis towards the target . He has just re-rotated his pelvis around his 'pressure loaded' right hip joint which is stabilised on the tush line.

On the backswing , he has :

a. Stretched his pelvic girdle rotary muscles, especially his right ones- image 1.
b. Pressure loaded into his right hip socket keeping it very stabilised on the tush line (but not rock solid) - image 1
c. Contracted his pelvic girdle rotary muscles , especially his right ones - this rotates his pelvis anti-clockwise from this view pulling his sacrum and therefore left butt-cheek towards the tush line. This is represented by images 2 and 3.
*Note that he has also contracted his left pelvic girdle rotary muscles on an 'unweighted' left 'leg /hip socket' which will pull on his left femur/knee causing it to externally rotate in the hip socket. That is why you will normally see pro golfers left knee move anti-clockwise first in the downswing , its not their pelvis rotating but the left femur/knee being pulled around.*



1621429302154.png


To make it easier to visualise I've drawn a triangle to represent his pelvis and yellow line to represent the right pelvic girdle rotary muscle which connects the upper femur (blue dot) near the hip socket to the sacrum (tip of that triangle). As the 'blue dot right femur' is kept stable in space and the 'yellow line muscle ' contracted , it will pull and rotate the 'tip of the triangle sacrum' anti-clockwise (including the left side of the pelvis) towards the tush line.



1621432787562.png


Here's a better picture to show how the muscles connect from the sacrum to the upper thigh bone (femur). Imagine what would happen if that hand kept the femur immovable in space (as seen below) and then you contract the muscles (not included in this picture but represented by the blue/red arrows) . Point 1 and Point 3 would move towards point 2 and 4 rotating the pelvis anti-clockwise (from a birds-eye view) . By the time the hips are square the muscles have exhausted their ability to contract anymore and the golfer will mainly use his leg muscles (glutes) to keep the pelvis rotating to and through impact.

1621687042137.png
 

Attachments

Last edited:

WILDTHING

Active member
Joined
Sep 16, 2018
Messages
531
Reaction score
184
Handicap
15
Found some more videos which I must admit look very convincing matching pga pro player swings to right hand grip styles. It seems that 'under' golfers have a lower ROC (rate of clubface closure) than the side-on and on-top type grip styles. Also, all 'under' type golfers seem to have lots of lateral bend in their spine (ouch!) in the downswing .


 

WILDTHING

Active member
Joined
Sep 16, 2018
Messages
531
Reaction score
184
Handicap
15
Here's an older article that Mike Adams wrote in 2012 but it's essentially the same test for backswing and downswing plane. The trail elbow test overrides the forearm vs upper arm test and even though you might not swing on the 'ideal' backswing plane its best to hone in and do drills to slot in the correct downswing plane ( he says not to fight your natural tendencies in the backswing plane ).

COVER STORY: THE RIGHT SWING FOR YOU Find Your Pages 1 - 9 - Flip PDF Download | FlipHTML5

The newer material obviously refines some of the tests and is now looking at how the grip (especially the trail grip) can match your biomechanical swing pattern. There does seem to be lots of evidence to validate his opinions so it might be quite revolutionary in golf teaching instruction.

There is already one possible problem that was spotted by Dr Jeff Mann and it concerns Terry Rowles twitter video below concerning 'On-Top' golfers


The video infers that 'On-Top' golfers (ie. like Rory McIlroy) deploy a weaker trail hand grip and that their trail forearm will tend to straighten earlier in the downswing before impact and rotate the clubface closed (look at the video showing how his trail forearm pronates approaching and moving through impact - also see image below).

1622249971032.png

But I have received a message from a well known golf teacher who has the largest 3D database in the world of pga pro golfers .

He told me the following:

"To be clear the trail arm will be supinating to just before impact in every tour player in my data base. You for sure want it to pronate through impact."

I did mention this to Terry Rowles so maybe him and Mike Adams need to tweak their instruction to ensure that they describe the correct hand release biomechanics approaching impact that also match the 3D graph evidence.

Check out Rory McIlroy's supinated trail forearm approaching impact

1622250486020.png

Dr Jeff Man comment below:

" His right forearm never becomes pronated through impact and his right palm never rolls over his left hand (as seen in Terry Rowles' on-top images) and his right palm never faces the ground"


You will note that Dr Jeff Mann disagrees with the well known golf instructors statement above where he says "You for sure want it to pronate through impact" but they both seem to agree that the trail arm is supinating to just before impact for all pro golfers in the 3D database.
 
Last edited:

WILDTHING

Active member
Joined
Sep 16, 2018
Messages
531
Reaction score
184
Handicap
15
$250 to view all the videos in the link below ! A bit too pricey for me although I'd like to see any evidence like 3D graphs showing the trail/lead grip and forearm positions vs clubface at address (for many pga pros) and how they move for On Top/Side-On/Under golfers throughout the golf swing. Maybe also showing how the planes that each arm and the club make, plus lateral movement data and graphs of ground reaction forces proving whether the golfer is a glider, spinner or launcher (or a mix).

Links — The Ultimate Golf Lesson
 

scc13

Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2017
Messages
46
Reaction score
1
Location
Bay Area
Handicap
12.2
$250 to view all the videos in the link below ! A bit too pricey for me although I'd like to see any evidence like 3D graphs showing the trail/lead grip and forearm positions vs clubface at address (for many pga pros) and how they move for On Top/Side-On/Under golfers throughout the golf swing. Maybe also showing how the planes that each arm and the club make, plus lateral movement data and graphs of ground reaction forces proving whether the golfer is a glider, spinner or launcher (or a mix).

Links — The Ultimate Golf Lesson
I’m about 2/3rds through the videos at the ultimate golf lesson. There is some fantastic content, including videos of lessons. I have made pages of notes based off of my swing/measurements that have been super helpful.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

WILDTHING

Active member
Joined
Sep 16, 2018
Messages
531
Reaction score
184
Handicap
15
There is also a video below by MA which claims that the lead wrist stabilises the hips and that the trail wrist controls/stabilises the clubface rather than the lead wrist . Just wondering whether the videos go into detail to explain all of this?


Obviously there are ways to square the clubface with just the lead wrist too as shown in the video below of a one-armed golfer Logan Aldridge (who has a weak/neutral grip and an open pelvis).



Also , there are other ways to get forward shaft lean before impact with fast hips and neutral/weak grips.
 
Last edited:

muise.mathieu

New member
Joined
Jun 12, 2021
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Found some more videos which I must admit look very convincing matching pga pro player swings to right hand grip styles. It seems that 'under' golfers have a lower ROC (rate of clubface closure) than the side-on and on-top type grip styles. Also, all 'under' type golfers seem to have lots of lateral bend in their spine (ouch!) in the downswing .


Where did you get these videos? You wouldn’t happen to have the other ultimate golf lesson? I really want to watch them but they are not cheap
 

WILDTHING

Active member
Joined
Sep 16, 2018
Messages
531
Reaction score
184
Handicap
15
Where did you get these videos? You wouldn’t happen to have the other ultimate golf lesson? I really want to watch them but they are not cheap
The ones I've posted are free for the public to see on you-tube and vimeo. I don't have access to the other ultimate golf lesson videos (I think there are many that are hours long ) because the package is too expensive for me at $250 . I'm not sure what else these videos will say other than define how to measure a strong and weak grip , repeat the Mike Adam tests, repeat the 'kinetics' stuff that Dr Sasho Mackenzie has already written about and produced videos (free to the public). I think they will also go through in detail how ground reaction forces are measured and probably provide a plethora of examples of before and after grf graphs to prove that their theories work. I think you can learn a lot about ground reaction forces from Dr Scott Lynn video below.

 

muise.mathieu

New member
Joined
Jun 12, 2021
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
The ones I've posted are free for the public to see on you-tube and vimeo. I don't have access to the other ultimate golf lesson videos (I think there are many that are hours long ) because the package is too expensive for me at $250 . I'm not sure what else these videos will say other than define how to measure a strong and weak grip , repeat the Mike Adam tests, repeat the 'kinetics' stuff that Dr Sasho Mackenzie has already written about and produced videos (free to the public). I think they will also go through in detail how ground reaction forces are measured and probably provide a plethora of examples of before and after grf graphs to prove that their theories work. I think you can learn a lot about ground reaction forces from Dr Scott Lynn video below.

Thanks for the added video link! Anyone else with video or website info links please share, I’m trying to get as much information as I can. During my testing I seem to be a Rear post, Side-cover or cover R hand grip, for ground reaction forces I believe i’m primarily a glider (horizontal force), and somewhat of a launcher (vertical force). If anyone knows your pros that have a similar profile let me know, I’d like to watch slow motion swings. Thanks all!
 

Welcome to The Hackers Paradise

Don't just play golf, live it!

Register Log in
Top