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DucatiGirl

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That sounds great.
It’s so simple and yet lovely. You can feed it to guests or throw it together after a round of golf. Brilliantly simple.

I’ve used Boursin before in it but that gets a bit spendy - however it does give it a much lighter flavor than goat cheese
 
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PB&J Overnight Oats

- 1/2 cup quick cooking oats
- 1/2 cup milk of choice
- 2TBS to 1/4 cup jelly, depending on how much jelly you like (I used Welch's low sugar grape jelly)
- 1 TBS PB2 peanut butter powder, or you could use real peanut or nut butter of choice
- 2 tsp chia seeds
- 1 tsp maple syrup/honey or sweetener of choice (optional)

Directions:

Add everything to a mason jar, shake well, and place in the fridge overnight.

**I used 1/4 cup jelly this time, but the sugar content is a little too high for me, so I am going to reduce it to 2 TBS next time, I think the jelly flavor will still be fine.**
 

mpeterson

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PB&J Overnight Oats

- 1/2 cup quick cooking oats
- 1/2 cup milk of choice
- 2TBS to 1/4 cup jelly, depending on how much jelly you like (I used Welch's low sugar grape jelly)
- 1 TBS PB2 peanut butter powder, or you could use real peanut or nut butter of choice
- 2 tsp chia seeds
- 1 tsp maple syrup/honey or sweetener of choice (optional)

Directions:

Add everything to a mason jar, shake well, and place in the fridge overnight.
I do something similar and it's my favorite overnight oats. Instead of the jelly I use frozen raspberries.
 

mpeterson

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That's a really good idea, I have a ton of frozen strawberries and blueberries, I could try that because I know they breakdown overnight.
We've done it with both raspberries and blueberries - I think the raspberries work better - the blueberries don't break down quite as much. I haven't tried strawberries, but I bet that's good.
 

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We've done it with both raspberries and blueberries - I think the raspberries work better - the blueberries don't break down quite as much. I haven't tried strawberries, but I bet that's good.
I did a simple overnight oat last night that was really good. I swapped the milk for cold brew coffee, added oats, chia seeds and some honey to it. Delicious!

Every night I randomly throw things together I think will taste good, and then I test it out in the morning. I have done coffee for milk before, but normally I used maple syrup, this time I used honey and it was much sweeter.
 

mpeterson

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I did a simple overnight oat last night that was really good. I swapped the milk for cold brew coffee, added oats, chia seeds and some honey to it. Delicious!

Every night I randomly throw things together I think will taste good, and then I test it out in the morning. I have done coffee for milk before, but normally I used maple syrup, this time I used honey and it was much sweeter.
Did you include milk/almond milk with the coffee, or just black? that sounds good.

Speaking of, maple syrup as a sweetener for coffee is delicious. Something I got talked into trying up in VT.
 

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Did you include milk/almond milk with the coffee, or just black? that sounds good.

Speaking of, maple syrup as a sweetener for coffee is delicious. Something I got talked into trying up in VT.
No milk, just black cold brew coffee, it's really good! But I recommend using a little less liquid, for some reason it doesn't soak up as much as milk.
 

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No milk, just black cold brew coffee, it's really good! But I recommend using a little less liquid, for some reason it doesn't soak up as much as milk.
We've got a bunch of the Stok cold brew in the fridge, so maybe I'll give this a shot when we get back from vacation. I need to get back to overnight oats.
 

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We've got a bunch of the Stok cold brew in the fridge, so maybe I'll give this a shot when we get back from vacation. I need to get back to overnight oats.
That would work perfectly. It's just too hot right now to make a hot breakfast, so I am all over the overnight oats right now.
 

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Not really a recipe sharing but technique question: How do you make cheesecake without the top portion cracking? I've made two recently and it happened both times.
A common rule of thumb is the water bath, did you cook it in a springform pan that is wrapped in foil and then placed in another casserole dish or deep cookie sheet with some warm water added to it?
Just went back a couple pages to catch up on any recipes that might catch my eye and came across these posts

Have you tried the no-cook cheesecake recipes?

Simple strawberry cheesecake

Ingredients

250g digestive biscuits
100g butter, melted
1 vanilla pod
600g cream cheese
100g icing sugar
284ml pot of double cream

For the topping

400g punnet of strawberries, halved
25g icing sugar


1 - To make the base, butter and line a 23cm loose-bottomed tin with baking parchment. Put the digestive biscuits in a plastic food bag and crush to crumbs using a rolling pin. Transfer the crumbs to a bowl, then pour over the melted butter. Mix thoroughly until the crumbs are completely coated. Tip them into the prepared tin and press firmly down into the base to create an even layer. Chill in the fridge for 1 hr to set firmly.

(To ensure the base sets properly, the melted butter must be thoroughly mixed through the biscuit crumbs. Make sure you also leave it in the fridge to firm up for at least 1 hr before adding the filling so that the crumbs do not mix into the soft cheese mixture)

2 - Slice the vanilla pod in half lengthways, leaving the tip intact, so that the two halves are still joined. Holding onto the tip of the pod, scrape out the seeds using the back of a kitchen knife.

3 - Place the cream cheese, icing sugar and the vanilla seeds in a bowl, then beat with an electric mixer until smooth. Tip in the double cream and continue beating until the mixture is completely combined. Now spoon the cream mixture onto the biscuit base, starting from the edges and working inwards, making sure that there are no air bubbles. Smooth the top of the cheesecake down with the back of a dessert spoon or spatula. Leave to set in the fridge overnight.

4 - Bring the cheesecake to room temperature about 30 mins before serving. To remove it from the tin, place the base on top of a can, then gradually pull the sides of the tin down. Slip the cake onto a serving plate, removing the lining paper and base. Purée half the strawberries in a blender or food processor with the icing sugar and 1 tsp water, then sieve. Pile the remaining strawberries onto the cake, and pour the purée over the top.
 

DucatiGirl

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DG's Oldest BFF's ex-boyfriend's mother's grandmother's recipe for Pico de Gallo

(And no, not makin that up - I learned it from Paco's mom, but she used a different name for it; alas, neither my Spanish nor my memory is very good, so I can't remember what she called it, but to me, in modern cuisine, it's Pico de Gallo-y)

Ingredients
Buncha good tasty happy tomatoes - I use 5-6 vine ripened small tomatoes, as the big beefsteak ones just don't work as well and usually taste pretty bad to me. If you have the ducets, I like the Roma variety too. Canned tomatoes just won't work here - you need fresh
1 small yellow onion - Spanish or viadlia is fine, size to match the amount of tomatoes. If you're using a crap ton of tomatoes, get a larger onion
Garlic bulb - look for white outside, and squeeze it tightly in your fist, there shouldn't be any give between the cloves. Please don't use the nasty stuff in the jar, either, that poor humiliated minced garlic!
Metric crap ton of Cilantro
1-2 Jalapenos, or a pobalano if you're a bit of a wimp

Instructions and Warnings: beware of segues
Whip out your cutting board and a good sharp knife - emphasis on the sharp part. I use an 8" Santoku chef knife for darn near everything. Alternately, whip out your large bowl food processor. Pull out a bowl for your pico to reside in, preferably glass, definitely not aluminum. Plastic is okay but fresh garlic has a way of seeping into it and gettin' a little funky after awhile.

If you like your pico watery, you can core the tomatoes and set them aside, but ungh, really? I personally can't stand watery salsa or pico, so I quarter the tomato around the core, and take out the pulp and seeds. I also prefer to chop this up by hand, because I have the knife skills for it. If you don't, or the thought of lovingly chopping up vegetables for an hour turns you off, then pull out your food processor. If using your food processor, set the chunked up maters aside for last. If cutting by hand, make small salsa-sized bits out of your seeded tomatoes and put them in the bowl.

At this point eyeball the amount of tomatoes, and realize that you're making this for other people too. So get out a second bowl so you can put some aside and not set your baby cousin on fire. Adult social services might have an issue if you overload her pico with jalapeno. Plus, she's feisty and you'll never hear the end of it.

Chop off both ends of the onion and pull off the papery bits. If you're using the food processor, cut in chunks and toss in. If you're chopping by hand, make a nice lovely dice and add to your tomatoes, eyeballing how much to put in. If you like a lot of onion, go with an eyeballed 1:2 ratio. I prefer about a 1:3 ratio of tomato to onion.

Pull out a few cloves of garlic from the bulb. Folks new to cooking or others who don't usually deal with fresh garlic: the easy way to peel them when you are just going to mince the garlic is to set a clove on the cutting board, rest the flat of your knife on top of it, make a fist and give it a good whack. The paper comes right off. If hitting your knife with your fist sounds slightly demented and/or terrifying, use the knife to press down on it hard, and it'll smush.

Pounding it is just way more fun.

Slice off the little woody end of the garlic clove. Here's where it gets a bit tricky. If you have a cast iron stomach, or your spouse is away on business, or you're pretty sure you won't be smoochin' anyone for the next 24 hours, eat one of the cloves or a slice of it. Sometimes garlic can be bitter, so you don't want to put TOO much in the pico if that's the case. If it tastes okay, then dump away. Just put 3-4 cloves in the food processor (more if you're making a ton), or mince by hand and put in your bowl.

Ensure that your cilantro is, in fact, not flat leaf italian parsley, because your local grocery store TOTALLY mislabeled everything and you had to stand there in the grocery store with another woman eating green leaves to make sure. Roll your eyes and wish you were back in Houston for about 5 seconds until you remember you were flooded out and left homeless, and decide that's worth paying an extra 40 cents for cilantro that may or may not be parsley.

Some people do not like cilantro. I think those people are nuts. However, remember the people you're cooking for do not like cilantro or spicy foods nearly as much as you do. Mourn the state of your pico and that you've now spent 30 minutes chopping veggies by hand. Get out a third bowl because dammit, you deserve your own. Put in a handful of cilantro to taste in the food processor bowl, or mince up a bunch on the cutting board and add to your hand cut mix.

If using the food processor, give it a couple of pulses to get everything to ALMOST the right size. Add the tomatoes and CAREFULLY pulse until they are chopped. If you just mash down on the chop button and start browsing THP, you're going to make TexMex spaghetti sauce. Keep your eyes on the prize!

If you're hand chopping, stir it up and eyeball the mix, or taste it. At this point, you should nod your head with a smug smirk. Grab your jalapeno(s).

STOP.

JUST STOP.

Do you wear contacts? Do you occassionaly scratch inside your ear, even though you know you're not supposed to? Do you have allergies and fall allergy season is upon us? Are you going to stick your bare finger up your nose? If the answer to that last one is yes, gross, use a Kleenex. Is that Kleenex gonna rip and tear?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, eye that jalapeno warily. If you get the oil underneath your fingernail, and you put in OR take out your contacts, you will basically pepper spray your eyeball (ask me how I learned that one). That same oil under the fingernails will wreck havoc on your delicate nasal passages too (ask me how I learned that one when the Kleenex ripped). Same with your ear lobe (ask me how I learned that one; clearly I have a hard head). There are several strategies - the best is to use food prep gloves, or if you're living in a house with someone with special needs, totally steal a pair of latex- and powder-free medical gloves. If these are not available to you, plan ahead and get a finger nail brush to the kitchen sink and ensure you have both hot water and dishwashing liquid. If it's close to dinner time, TAKE OUT YOUR CONTACTS NOW before proceeding, or else plan to sleep in them, which is a terrible idea, so take them out now. If you're taking a shower later and plan to wash your hair, you're probably okay. But don't say I didn't warn you.

The old saying "no glove, no love" should also apply to your love of spicy peppers.

Okay, now you can proceed with the jalapeno chopping. You want to core it and ditch the seeds, then slice lengthwise into thin strips and dice. Split the pico between three bowls, so you've saved your baby cousin from surefire death by jalapeno, and you've got less cilantro and a little jalapeno for your older cousin, and the dump the rest in the third bowl.

If you're willing to admit to being a bit of a wimp, substitute a poblano for your jalapeno. There's still oil in the pepper, though, so see previous notes about careful washing prior to delicate eye, ear, nose, or belly button scratching.

At this point, you should grab your tortilla chips. When you taste yours, you should feel a smug smirk lift the corner of your mouth, and you should start nodding in a very cocky manner. The level of smugness you're looking for here is "smack that smirk off the face" level of smug. The smirk should be so smirky it ought to be illegal in all 50 states and Puerto Rico.

Good eating, my friends. Use as salsa, or dollop on your tacos/fajitas. Or whatever blows your skirt up. Your pico, your rules.
 
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@Golfergal any chance you still have that great breakfast casserole recipe and you could post/send please?
 

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This is not a recipe, but a cooking tip I just learned, and can't believe I didn't think of this myself. If you put a little shredded zucchini (water squeezed out of it) in a turkey burger it makes it super moist. I think I never tried this before because I hate ground turkey, but decided to give a turkey burger a whirl again, and this made a big difference in the moistness of it.
 

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Choose Your Own Adventure Beef Stew
(adapted from the pioneer woman)



Deliciousness abounds, as do tangents: be warned

Ingredients
Olive oil
3 lb chuck roast
1 medium onion, chopped
2-3 stalks celery, chopped
2-3 large carrots, chopped
2 medium turnips
4-5 garlic cloves, minced
Small can of tomato paste
Box of beef stock
Worcestershire sauce
Thyme (fresh if ya got it)
Bay leaf
Salt and pepper
Red potatoes
Sour cream
Butter
5-10 more cloves of garlic
Fresh parsley, minced (don’t use the humiliated dried parsley - use good fresh flat leaf/Italian parsley)

Choose your own adventure stew:

If you like your stew beefy, use a larger roast. If you like your stew with more veggies, add more veggies. Choose your own. You stew you. Just stew it.

Pick out your beef chuck roast, about 3 lbs. Look for marbled beef because stew cooks for 2-3 hours, and you need the fat to make the melt-in-your-mouth bit. If you use lean steak, it’ll be rubbery and gross - grill the steak, don’t stew it!

Cut the chuck roast into bite sized chunks against the grain. You can trim any big slabs of fat - you want marbled meat, yes, but not a pound of lard. I don’t like to buy pre cut beef stew at the store - usually it’s more expensive and I can make sure it’s cut and trimmed properly.

Salt and pepper liberally - this is 3 pounds of beef, dude. Don’t be wimpy.

At this point, stop to wash your hands, glance in the dish drainer, close your eyes and count to ten, then stomp to your teenaged niece’s room, drag her back into the kitchen to rewash all the cake pans she “washed” and have a discussion about kitchen hygiene and respect for others. Wait five minutes for her to finish, then call her back to wash out the stand mixer. Endure another five minutes of whiny teenager with grace, or some vague semblance of it, really. Remember this is why you didn’t have kids yourself. Oof.

Announce loudly in your best impersonation of Grandmama from the Addams Family movie: dinner’s gonna be late!

Put a couple of glugs of olive oil into a Dutch oven or soup pot or a very large “everyday” pan if you’re lucky enough to have one. I am, but it’s still in Houston with what’s left of my stuff post-Harvey. Dammit. Turn on medium high heat, and once it’s hot, put about half the beef in the pot and brown carefully. Don’t be impatient on this part and chuck all the chuck in - you’ll get a watery mess. When the beef is browned, pop into a bowl and brown the other half - when done, add to the bowl of beef.

Don’t worry about the brown bits in the pan. More flavor! Add a dollop of olive oil or butter if the pan needs some fat, then slide in your onions and celery.

Choose your own adventure moment: if you like your beef stew carrots to melt in your mouth, add them to the pot now. If you like your carrots with a little more tooth, reserve with the turnips for later.

Add your garlic to taste. I love garlic. Can’t get enough of it. I use a whole head of garlic for this meal - not joking. So add the amount of garlic that blows your skirt up. Just be careful not to burn it.

Add the tomato paste to the veggies and stir it on in and let it cook 2-3 minutes. I usually push the veggies to the outside and make a little ring and sort of toast the tomato paste a bit, the way my Uncle Carmen taught me, it gives it some flavor depth. Then add the beef back in, and about 4 cups of beef stock, or 1 box. It’ll look watery but don’t panic.

Add a few glugs of Worcestershire sauce, doing your best Looney Tunes impersonation of the chef making hasenpfeffer (obscure reference alert!). Alternately, a Swedish Chef impersonation is never amiss. Especially if you have Swedish friends. Which I do. And it annoys them. Which it does.

Add in several sprigs of fresh thyme and a bay leaf or two. Or shake in some dried thyme and add a bay leaf or two.

Turn the heat down to low to maintain a simmer, and walk away for a couple hours.

Well, not really. I mean, you want to stir the pot every once in awhile, and if there’s one thing we’ve learned from the internet, it’s how to stir a pot. But I digress.

When the stew has stewed for about 2 hours, add your turnips to the pot - if you chose to wait on the carrots, add them now too. First, though, take a moment to wonder why there’s wax on your turnip. Second, remember to be sneaky because your youngest niece might qualify for World’s Pickiest Eater and despite your level of care (not my problem, she’s almost 12 and can make a peanut butter sandwich), the word “turnip” is new to the house and you don’t want to feed the drama llama.

Now is a good time to taste - more pepper? More salt? More thyme? The level of yum should be a smirk and a head nod at this point. Pop the lid back on and let the stew stew.

Now it’s time to start the mashed potatoes. I know, I know - I don’t put potatoes in my stew. Bear with me. It’s worth it.

I suggest you use regular old red potatoes and just chop them into chunks for smashed taters.
Alas reference the World’s Pickiest Child and her mother, who begged you to make regular mashed potatoes without the skin so the Philistine Child will eat - so pretend with me that I didn’t have to peel a metric crap ton of potatoes.

So throw your chunked up taters into some water. Add a bit of salt for flavor. Grab the leftover garlic cloves, smash them with the back of your knife, peel off the papery bits, and chuck the smushed cloves in with the potatoes. Boil boil toil and trouble, cauldron burn and taters bubble - you can’t time smashed taters. Stick a fork in them to see if they’re done (if you can mash a chunk against the side of the pot easily, they’re done. If there’s resistance, they’re not done). Drain the potatoes by holding the lid in place over the sink while your sister in law protests that she has a strainer. Reply that you’re not in the mood to wash it.

Choose your own adventure: potato style
If you have a hand mixer and like creamy taters, use it on the taters. If you like a more homemade style, use a classic hand masher. Or, since you are in someone else’s kitchen, use the hand masher because they have the hand mixer body but have lost the actual beaters somewhere in the house.

Wish I was making that up.

You want stiffer potatoes here than your traditional Thanksgiving style. They’ve got to stand up to the stew sauce. So add half a stick of butter and a couple of dollops of sour cream. Do yourself a favor and never put milk in mashed potatoes, ever. Mix carefully, then hand over the masher to your teenaged niece and turn away quickly, as she is rather enthusiastic about the mashing thing and sends spuds flying.

Taste the smashed taters. Glance at niece, wink, and shush her. When your healthfreak brother who is a yoga instructor with an anger management issue leaves the kitchen, wink again and add the other half stick of butter when he isn’t watching. Giggle conspiratorially with your niece.

Snap off the stew. Sprinkle in a handful of minced parsley. Stir and taste. You should stomp your foot and yell “damn I’m good!” Give your confused niece a taste, she should jump up and down in place and yell “damn she’s good!”

It’s pop quiz time!

How many sprigs of thyme and how many bay leaves did you add? It’s fishing time! Fish out the sprigs and bay leaves (this last is important - they’ll make you sick if you eat them, so I joke but really, find all the bay leaves!).

Dishing up:
Put a good spoon of taters in half of the bowl. Spoon the stew in the other. It looks stunning and it’s fun to eat. If you’re feeling frisky (or want to get someone else frisky), add a sprinkle of fresh minced parsley for garnish.

Serve and bask in the praise, while rolling your eyes at the ungrateful child who only ate the beef chunks and the potatoes that didn’t touch the stew.

Then look sadly at the pot and realize your plan for lunch tomorrow alas was eaten for dinner.
 

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How have I never seen this thread. When a chance to expand my crazy shorthand recipes I’ve made up, I’ll add my seafood pot pie, and manicotti. My wife actually prefers them to going out to a nice restaurant for special events so must actually be good.
 

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This is not a recipe, but a cooking tip I just learned, and can't believe I didn't think of this myself. If you put a little shredded zucchini (water squeezed out of it) in a turkey burger it makes it super moist. I think I never tried this before because I hate ground turkey, but decided to give a turkey burger a whirl again, and this made a big difference in the moistness of it.
Our favorite turkey burger recipe.... https://www.hellmanns.com/us/en/recipes/tasty-turkey-burger-recipe.html?gclid=Cj0KCQjwmPPYBRCgARIsALOziAOMvbouTp0maHdn9jAy2FIfIEkmUwizFRmS_q70SK9dDtgrPqgPgFUaAjwOEALw_wcB

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
 

GolferGal

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DNice26

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Man you guys know how to eat!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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