The 60 and over Thread

My buddy let me try a Maxfli Tour ball on Thursday. I loved it, but I’ve got so many Oncore’s, it will be a while before I lose them all…
 
The Recoil Darts launch the sh*t outta the ball, don’t they? 😂
That nice high draw is exactly what I wanted to walk out of the studio with this morning. I play off standard lies to start but this set was 1* flat. I didn’t think that would be a big deal, but it was. I was hitting everything with a little fade, which isn’t my preference. My fitter is a bit of a mad scientist as it is, and combine that with me knowing exactly what I want from an iron, we got to work.
My carry with a smooth 54* (highest loft I take a full swing with) is a hair under 85 yds.
I want an AW to carry 100 and then I work off that to dial in everything else. I don’t care what he has to do to get the AW there, but once we do, we go to the next club (PW) and get that one to go 12-14 yds further. That continues through the set. Like you I want to be able to draw the ball most of the time.
If you were to ask me to tell you the lofts we ended up with, I couldn’t tell you, as they were all over the map. Thankfully he has it all stored in his computer 🙄.
I do remember he strengthened the loft of the 5i 1* to 22* to gap with my 4H and I think he weakened the AW to gap with the CBX 54* but by how much I don’t know.
If I had to guess I think my set now goes from the 22* 5i to about 50*(?) which is 28* between 7 clubs.
I have the 5I, but don't bag it. I go from 6I to 9 wood. It usually gaps well for me. And I am much more consistent with the fairway wood. And yes, I am loving that Dart shaft. Works great with the DCB head.
Spec loft on the A wedge is 49⁰ and it is a howitzer, but I have no issue with it gapping with the 54 CBX.
 
I play the KE4+ irons and considered the Max irons when they came out. I’m kind of ignorant when it comes to bounce and what’s best for me, however.

I’m sure the swing will come back for you. Maybe start with the partial backswing and partial follow through???

Which shafts are you playing?

I’m trying the Rapport 70 R shafts. I had demoed some UST DART shafts in 95 R and got good results. But I heard that these two play very similar so I put these in instead.
I really think a lot of my issues are weight. I think I need heavier shafts.
All my older clubs, mostly Mizuno, were steel. Loved the 950 GH and the 105’s.
Hmmmmm
 
I really think a lot of my issues are weight.
My main issue is weight as well. But my golf clubs have nothing to do with it.:eek:
 
I found a perfect hard pan surface in my yard from which to work on this part of the game (turf next to the driveway that is really compacted). I took a few wedges out there to see if there was a better club for my swing and discovered it's likely more of a technique issue than equipment.

That said, the Hogan Sure-out (56/6) was not as good as my two gamers, 56/10 Hogan SW and the 60/10 Cleveland CBX2. I also took out the Hogan Radial E and my gamer Maltby GW - neither of which felt very good with the distance I was working on. I have a couple other wedges I didn't try because those have more bounce.

With the exception of the Sure-out - a club I just picked up at a yard sale and don't hit particularly well - all of these wedges I consider easy to hit from just about any other type of lie.

What I think is there just isn't a lot of margin for error as there is with most other lies. It's going to take some work to discover the perfect ball position, club and swing.

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I’m sitting in he recliner with a heat pad on my back trying to get it loosened up so I can play tomorrow. Apparently, the changes I made at a GolfTec to widen my takeaway. It worked great until my back started hurting and I started flinching on the back 9. Ice, heat and Volterin. Old age is not for sissies!
 
I found a perfect hard pan surface in my yard from which to work on this part of the game (turf next to the driveway that is really compacted). I took a few wedges out there to see if there was a better club for my swing and discovered it's likely more of a technique issue than equipment.

That said, the Hogan Sure-out (56/6) was not as good as my two gamers, 56/10 Hogan SW and the 60/10 Cleveland CBX2. I also took out the Hogan Radial E and my gamer Maltby GW - neither of which felt very good with the distance I was working on. I have a couple other wedges I didn't try because those have more bounce.

With the exception of the Sure-out - a club I just picked up at a yard sale and don't hit particularly well - all of these wedges I consider easy to hit from just about any other type of lie.

What I think is there just isn't a lot of margin for error as there is with most other lies. It's going to take some work to discover the perfect ball position, club and swing.

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I have a Sure-Out I bought back in the early 80's. Not labeled for loft or bounce, but It was designed for when bunkers had lots of fluffy sand in them., If I were to take a guess my Sure Out has 58* of loft and 14-16 degrees of bounce. Not exactly tight lie friendly. Just looking at them, that CBX2, with its wide sole would be the most consistent to hit. Play the ball just barely forward of middle, like one ball width in front of the middle. Feet close together, most important, critical to good pitching and chipping...
1) Weight on front foot! There is no weight transfer. Just put it there and keep it there!
2) Dont mess with the hands. Just let them hinge and unhinge naturally for the length of swing, but they are NOT providing any power.
Keep the club handle in front of you at all times. Longer back swing means more hip turn. No hands, no arms. Repeatable path.
ALL power comes from the turning of the hips through impact. No matter how short the back swing, the belt buckle always faces the target on follow through.
3) tempo, tempo tempo. Slow, slow slow. People rush their short pitches and chips. Yes, you want to accelerate through the ball on every shot, but that doesn't mean you yank the club back and swipe at the ball. Smooth, let the hips turn, driving everything else with them. And keep that backswing short and tight.

I was working with a promising 11 yr old today. Front side to back side he dropped 12 strokes. Biggest change between 9's was his pitching and chipping, because he had a real long back swing, then had nowhere to go with it because if he accelerated the whole way back he would have overshot that target. So then, coming in with all hands and arms and no real hip turn, the club face was all over the place. at first he didn't believe you could hit a ball with no big back swing. Till I hit 5 80 yard 58* lobs in a row into an 8' circle on the sim practice range, club never getting any higher on the back swing than halfway between my knee and hip. I quit while I was ahead, never trying #6.. LOL
But he bought in after that, and really started using body, not arms and hands.
 
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I’m sitting in he recliner with a heat pad on my back trying to get it loosened up so I can play tomorrow. Apparently, the changes I made at a GolfTec to widen my takeaway. It worked great until my back started hurting and I started flinching on the back 9. Ice, heat and Volterin. Old age is not for sissies!
Celebrex is good stuff.
 
I'll never understand the need to have others tell you how to enjoy the game. I played from tees that were too difficult the other day because I wanted the challenge. The thing is, there was no confusion as to why I struggled.

If I play from 4600 yards enough times, I will eventually shoot my lowest score and it'll be enjoyable. But a DB from shorter tees can bring every bit as much frustration as not reaching a par 4 in 2 on a longer course.

There's something rewarding about playing a longer course and shooting a lower-than-average differential. That doesn't mean I'd attempt that when the course is busy or when I know my game is in the toilet. It's similar to pulling out the Hogan Radials and playing a round with those... or a 5 club challenge for that matter.

Of the half dozen courses I play on a regular basis, I know there are going to be holes where bogey is a good score - and I can 100% enjoy that kind of golf.
Well, sometimes it can actually do a world of good. Especially when the golfer in question is engaged in self deception. My main golf buddy thought he was still smacking drives out there 260-270 when he actually was around 210-220! It finally got to the point where I told him that he could play whatever tees he wanted, and I would do the same and moved up to the golds. I was sick and tired of having to hit fairway woods approaches on longer par 4's! The upshot of that was I started beating him far too often for his comfort, so he joined me.

Soon after that we were scrambling against his Son and his Son's buddy. They can both play a little bit. In fact, his Son's buddy can play really well! During the round, after narrowly missing an eagle putt on a par 5 leaving a tap in for birdie, I asked him, "Isn't it fun putting for eagles and birdies again?" He got this big smile on his face and admitted that it was. He was actually enjoying the game again. And we actually beat the two young'uns, so they bought us beer and a sandwich!
I figured out bounce by taking my wedges to a chipping green and hitting balls from both the "fairway" and rough until I figured it out.
It requires reading the grass just as you need to read greens to putt well. Last time out I brought three 58s, with 6, 8, and 12 degrees of bounce.

Sinking putts indoors all day long is just a starting point if you want to be good at putting.
Sinking long putts on the very first try is a valuable golfing skill.
Holing chip shots can save two strokes!
True, but maybe a little ambitious? All I want to do is get them close enough for tap ins, saving me at least one stroke. Even the pros don't make very many long putts or chips, but they usually leave the next shot at gimme range.
 
Well, sometimes it can actually do a world of good. Especially when the golfer in question is engaged in self deception. My main golf buddy thought he was still smacking drives out there 260-270 when he actually was around 210-220! It finally got to the point where I told him that he could play whatever tees he wanted, and I would do the same and moved up to the golds. I was sick and tired of having to hit fairway woods approaches on longer par 4's! The upshot of that was I started beating him far too often for his comfort, so he joined me.

Soon after that we were scrambling against his Son and his Son's buddy. They can both play a little bit. In fact, his Son's buddy can play really well! During the round, after narrowly missing an eagle putt on a par 5 leaving a tap in for birdie, I asked him, "Isn't it fun putting for eagles and birdies again?" He got this big smile on his face and admitted that it was. He was actually enjoying the game again. And we actually beat the two young'uns, so they bought us beer and a sandwich!

True, but maybe a little ambitious? All I want to do is get them close enough for tap ins, saving me at least one stroke. Even the pros don't make very many long putts or chips, but they usually leave the next shot at gimme range.
I can putt for birdies a lot. Making the putt, not so much. My putting has really suffered the past decade. Yips. Good lag, miss the 2' to close out the hole. All too often. I'd be better off from 12' all day than 2-3'. Geez I suck when I think about it.......
 
I took one on the course when it flared up. Never really kicked in.
Bummer. When that happens to me the next step is Norco. But it really doesn't do much for muscular issues for me, but it knocks the edge off of skeletal issues like my spine.
 
When I was a little kid I had a string of ten foot putts on the Wailua golf course in Hawaii.
Now that I've spent enough time on a tilted chipping green I've gotten my putting mojo back!
Just a matter of setting reasonable goals. Putting in the hours with increasingly hard practices. Adapting to ever changing conditions.
 
We played with a guy today who hit nothing but 125-150 yard slices and he took 4 shots to get on or close to 350 yard par 4s. We suggested moving up a set of tees in the future. He was like can I do that? We were like yeah. Our club has some silly rules about which tees to play, but he’s 68, so he can play the tees he wants.

I played in a tournament this year where they had the 70+ playing a course at 4500 yards. It was kind of ridiculous. The2nd round, at another course was at 5300 yards. Probably a little more fair. On the 4500 yard course I think I only hit driver 6 times.
 
We played with a guy today who hit nothing but 125-150 yard slices and he took 4 shots to get on or close to 350 yard par 4s. We suggested moving up a set of tees in the future. He was like can I do that? We were like yeah. Our club has some silly rules about which tees to play, but he’s 68, so he can play the tees he wants.

I played in a tournament this year where they had the 70+ playing a course at 4500 yards. It was kind of ridiculous. The2nd round, at another course was at 5300 yards. Probably a little more fair. On the 4500 yard course I think I only hit driver 6 times.
Heck, at 4500 , that's a 250 yard hole average. That could be a hoot..... We played an old local course recently that was barely over 6K and I had a blast. Half the par 4s were a drive and wedge. None over 400. The longest I recall was just under 380, and it plays down the prevailing SW winds in summer. It was dead into the the teeth of the stiff wind that cool day, but even my old butt got home in 2... Drive and 7 wood, but I got there
 
Well, sometimes it can actually do a world of good. Especially when the golfer in question is engaged in self deception. My main golf buddy thought he was still smacking drives out there 260-270 when he actually was around 210-220! It finally got to the point where I told him that he could play whatever tees he wanted, and I would do the same and moved up to the golds. I was sick and tired of having to hit fairway woods approaches on longer par 4's! The upshot of that was I started beating him far too often for his comfort, so he joined me.

Soon after that we were scrambling against his Son and his Son's buddy. They can both play a little bit. In fact, his Son's buddy can play really well! During the round, after narrowly missing an eagle putt on a par 5 leaving a tap in for birdie, I asked him, "Isn't it fun putting for eagles and birdies again?" He got this big smile on his face and admitted that it was. He was actually enjoying the game again. And we actually beat the two young'uns, so they bought us beer and a sandwich!
I didn't mean to be judgmental towards those who really aren't aware. I apologize for coming across that way.

I've tried so many things over the years to try and improve... I guess I assumed people would realize they're not having a fun and try to figure out why. Playing from different tees has always been something I've done. If I want to work on my driver, I'll play from one set of tees. If I want to work on my irons, I'll play from another. Tracking and knowing my distances has always been easy and it just seems intuitive that people would know to move up. My range is between 5,000 and 6,000 - dependent more on the difficulty of a course than just distance.

My problem is keeping the ball in front of me - with any club. I wish better golf for me was as simple as moving up.
 
Heck, at 4500 , that's a 250 yard hole average. That could be a hoot..... We played an old local course recently that was barely over 6K and I had a blast. Half the par 4s were a drive and wedge. None over 400. The longest I recall was just under 380, and it plays down the prevailing SW winds in summer. It was dead into the the teeth of the stiff wind that cool day, but even my old butt got home in 2... Drive and 7 wood, but I got there
Here’s my practice course and maybe my weekly thing. Turn 73 next year.
 

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Try to play about 4600-5000, 5200 is tough and absolutely struggle at 5500. Always been a short hitter, people are hitting 7i longer than my driver. Extremely rare that I don’t need driver on par 4 or 5, there is the occasional dogleg. Unless there’s a lot of roll about 160 yards is about what I’ve got. Rare that I have less than 5i/4h into the par fours.
 
Here’s my practice course and maybe my weekly thing. Turn 73 next year.
That looks nice. At least twice a month I play a local pitch and putt. That is 1454 from the "tips" . It realy keeps distance and flight control dialed in.
 
My problem is keeping the ball in front of me - with any club. I wish better golf for me was as simple as moving up.
Moving up is not going to be a panacea for all that ails you. However, it should leave you being able to hit shorter clubs for your approaches, which, theoretically, may be easier to hit or at least have tighter dispersion. That should eventually result in lower scores and more fun.
 
Here are 2 of the par 4s on the 4500 yard course I played in the 70+ division of the county tournament. Played both with a 7 iron and a short wedge.
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This hole plays uphill, severely sloped right of the fairway to a red staked penalty area. There is OB behind the hole too. Wide left is not good either. The greens on both these holes are the size of a 2.5 car garage. I hit 7 iron, 58* wedge.
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This hole is flat with mounds and OB left, red staked penalty area right. 7 iron, 52* wedge here.
 
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