The Home Renovation Thread

Let the FUN begin! Complete gut and remodel of the bathroom. I was really hoping to salvage most of the drywall but the old paneling that I was hoping was installed with just nails was in fact done with nails AND adhesive. So I decided to rip it all out. It will definitely make it easier for the electrical and plumbing upgrades I was planning.
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Please tell me you’re keeping the flooring! :ROFLMAO:
 
It’s time to replace the roof.
I got a quote. The number is what the number is.
What else should I be aware of and looking for?
The company uses Owen’s Corning architectural materials. Good? Bad? Indifferent?
Any tips for picking a color? We have blue/grey siding. We are thinking dark.
A few things to consider.
  • Are they going to remove the old roof or put the new roof over it? Generally, you are better off if they take the old roof off. Otherwise, you might have subroof damage that won't be detected--much less addressed and the new roof likely won't last as long as if they removed the old.
  • What is the warranty and WHO warrants it? Roofing companies come and go more often than not. If they go out of business and THEY back the warranty your warranty means nothing. It's also common to have one warranty on the materials and another on the installation and workmanship, so read the warranty CAREFULLY.
  • Owen's Corning makes lots of products with varying levels of quality and long-term durability. So, I can't tell you anything about the material quality without knowing more specifics.
  • Look up Google and Yelp reviews on this business and read them. The roofing company installing your roof matters A LOT. Not only will they greatly impact the experience you have getting the roof redone, but they impact the short and long-term durability of your new roof in many ways beyond those listed above. A couple of additional examples of this is how they do the flashing around pipes, chimneys, and seams. The attention paid to how well the roof, gutters, and downspouts interface (for example: you don't want the new roof spilling over the gutters).
  • The condition and age of your roof will not only matter for however long you remain in this house, but it will have a significant impact on the interest and sale price of your home. We sold a home in your neighboring state California last year. 28 years ago we had the shake roof removed and had it replaced with a steel interlocking shingle product that had a 30-year guarantee and was installed by a roofer that not only was one of the best at the time but continues to be so today. We've never had a leak or a problem and the roof passed inspection, except for some recommended re-caulking around some of the flashing, which we had done prior to putting the house on the market. This ended up being a plus to potential buyers, even with the roof being that old.
 
Doing all yourself? If so reach out on electrical if you need to.
Hey man...question. The house is 50 years old. I am assuming this old GE 100A service panel with 1/2" breakers is gonna limit me on its versatility. It seems like the largest breaker I can get for it is 50A. In my previous place I had installed a sub panel in my garage on a 60A circuit that took down and brought with me so I could install it in my new place. I ran an air compressor(220, 20A), receptacle and light circuit on it. Will it function well enough on a 50A circuit? I mean I guess I can just grab a 20A double pole breaker and install a single circuit for the compressor as I don't have too much need for the sub panel right now but I'm trying to think ahead for the flexibility it will provide me. I've also been considering just upgrading the entire service.
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Hey man...question. The house is 50 years old. I am assuming this old GE 100A service panel with 1/2" breakers is gonna limit me on its versatility. It seems like the largest breaker I can get for it is 50A. In my previous place I had installed a sub panel in my garage on a 60A circuit that took down and brought with me so I could install it in my new place. I ran an air compressor(220, 20A), receptacle and light circuit on it. Will it function well enough on a 50A circuit? I mean I guess I can just grab a 20A double pole breaker and install a single circuit for the compressor as I don't have too much need for the sub panel right now but I'm trying to think ahead for the flexibility it will provide me. I've also been considering just upgrading the entire service.
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50A 2 pole will work fine in that instance, only thing noticeable might be a slight dim in the lights when the compressor kicks on due to the high inrush but after that it’ll return to normal and we’re talking milliseconds.
 
A few things to consider.
  • Are they going to remove the old roof or put the new roof over it? Generally, you are better off if they take the old roof off. Otherwise, you might have subroof damage that won't be detected--much less addressed and the new roof likely won't last as long as if they removed the old.
  • What is the warranty and WHO warrants it? Roofing companies come and go more often than not. If they go out of business and THEY back the warranty your warranty means nothing. It's also common to have one warranty on the materials and another on the installation and workmanship, so read the warranty CAREFULLY.
  • Owen's Corning makes lots of products with varying levels of quality and long-term durability. So, I can't tell you anything about the material quality without knowing more specifics.
  • Look up Google and Yelp reviews on this business and read them. The roofing company installing your roof matters A LOT. Not only will they greatly impact the experience you have getting the roof redone, but they impact the short and long-term durability of your new roof in many ways beyond those listed above. A couple of additional examples of this is how they do the flashing around pipes, chimneys, and seams. The attention paid to how well the roof, gutters, and downspouts interface (for example: you don't want the new roof spilling over the gutters).
  • The condition and age of your roof will not only matter for however long you remain in this house, but it will have a significant impact on the interest and sale price of your home. We sold a home in your neighboring state California last year. 28 years ago we had the shake roof removed and had it replaced with a steel interlocking shingle product that had a 30-year guarantee and was installed by a roofer that not only was one of the best at the time but continues to be so today. We've never had a leak or a problem and the roof passed inspection, except for some recommended re-caulking around some of the flashing, which we had done prior to putting the house on the market. This ended up being a plus to potential buyers, even with the roof being that old.
Thanks for these tips. I read stuff closely and there were errors that needed to be corrected in writing. The contract is signed. With a little cooperation from the weather I should have a new roof just after Turkey Day.
 
I'd go dark and stay with more of a monotonous color (less/no variation) so the siding color is your focal point.

I have not heard bad things about Owens Corning. I would ask what the roofers plan to do for an underlayment (tar paper is fine) and if replacement of any plywood that is found to be bad is included with the cost. Ice and water shield at the eaves and not much else.
Thanks for these tips. I checked / confirmed it all.
 
I just picked up 10 gallons of paint last night so looks like my weekends for the next two months are tied up. Gosh I hate painting.
 
I just picked up 10 gallons of paint last night so looks like my weekends for the next two months are tied up. Gosh I hate painting.
I hate it too, pity I'm pretty good at it.
 
I just picked up 10 gallons of paint last night so looks like my weekends for the next two months are tied up. Gosh I hate painting.
My wife is on a project binge right now. This is the only time of year we can really do anything. Find myself saying a lot of "oh, that's a great idea" with my fingers crossed lol. She's the visionary and I'm the labor.
 
I just picked up 10 gallons of paint last night so looks like my weekends for the next two months are tied up. Gosh I hate painting.
Yeah quite a bit of painting in my near future as well...two more color samples today makes six. Hopefully now we pick one so i can start. Walls already prepped. Prep is so important for a good finished product
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Here's a painting question.

We bought this house in 2020 and it looks like somebody did a rush job to remove wallpaper and paint one of the bathrooms. The glue residue is showing through the paint and looks awful.

Is there a product I can use to hide that before I repaint? Maybe a texture in the paint or a couple heavy coats of a special primer? I really don't want to pay somebody to skim coat the walls.
 
Redoing the driveway is next. was redone in the mid-90s by some real estate folk were flipping some house. As with other renovations and additions made then, it was done as cheaply as possible and is now in pretty bad shape. This one is going to hurt.
 
Here's a painting question.

We bought this house in 2020 and it looks like somebody did a rush job to remove wallpaper and paint one of the bathrooms. The glue residue is showing through the paint and looks awful.

Is there a product I can use to hide that before I repaint? Maybe a texture in the paint or a couple heavy coats of a special primer? I really don't want to pay somebody to skim coat the walls.
By glue residue, do you mean its raised up? like lumpy or just bleeding through the paint? If just bleeding through a good primer will work. If raised up it it can usually be sanded down, primed and painted maybe with a thicker nap roller. Our office here was renovated a year ago and 40 year old wallpaper was removed and painted and it looks great.
 
Redoing the driveway is next. was redone in the mid-90s by some real estate folk were flipping some house. As with other renovations and additions made then, it was done as cheaply as possible and is now in pretty bad shape. This one is going to hurt.
Yeah I feel your pain. My driveway needs paving too and I am not looking forward to that giant expense
 
By glue residue, do you mean its raised up? like lumpy or just bleeding through the paint? If just bleeding through a good primer will work. If raised up it it can usually be sanded down, primed and painted maybe with a thicker nap roller. Our office here was renovated a year ago and 40 year old wallpaper was removed and painted and it looks great.
kind of a mix between bleed through and raised surfaces. You think I’m ok to sand the painted surface?
 
By glue residue, do you mean its raised up? like lumpy or just bleeding through the paint? If just bleeding through a good primer will work. If raised up it it can usually be sanded down, primed and painted maybe with a thicker nap roller. Our office here was renovated a year ago and 40 year old wallpaper was removed and painted and it looks great.
I would say the same thing, sand or scrape down. One of those flat edge razors should at least get it down to where it's minimal work.
 
kind of a mix between bleed through and raised surfaces. You think I’m ok to sand the painted surface?
If you're repainting it, why not?

We put up sheetrock, spackle in, sand and then paint over. It *should* be the same in your case I would assume, unless you've got something weird you're working with. You're painting over the whole thing or just a section?
 
Do we have any resident plumbers here? Have a question about shower drain piping....is 1-1/2" sufficient size? Not ideal I know but the old tub I ripped out was plumbed with it. I know standard now is 2" but I'm wondering if I can just use a 2" p-trap and stub and then reduce it to 1-1/2 a foot or so from the trap into the existing piping

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If you're repainting it, why not?

We put up sheetrock, spackle in, sand and then paint over. It *should* be the same in your case I would assume, unless you've got something weird you're working with. You're painting over the whole thing or just a section?
Yea that’s a good point. I’m going to paint the whole thing.
 
kind of a mix between bleed through and raised surfaces. You think I’m ok to sand the painted surface?
Absolutely....sanding is fine. The biggest concern with sanding is avoiding shredding the drywall paper but even that can be fixed with a couple coats of good primer and the primer will definitely fix the bleed-through
 
Yea that’s a good point. I’m going to paint the whole thing.
Sand it smooth and paint then. No fuss no muss.

Or scrap, sand, paint depending on how much they protrude.
 
Yeah I feel your pain. My driveway needs paving too and I am not looking forward to that giant expense
We’ve spoken with a couple of engineer friends both of whom say that, given the visible damage and some pretty obvious sub-surface drainage problems, we need to start from dirt. Adulting isn’t fun.
 
Not a huge project but something that will keep me busy this winter. Assuming we are not frozen solid quickly here in PA, I plan to add a dry stack stone wall to my garden, only a foot and a half high, 50 ish feet long. I have a badly deteriorating railroad tie wall that is more soil than wood at this point so it is time for an upgrade. I found a local quarry and all of the stone would be a $65 delivery fee. Other than a carbide chisel to level some of the stones, any other tools? I'll be building on a 4" gravel bed and add some larger loose stones for the base, top, and accents. I am kind of excited about it since it is a no rush, no electrical or plumbing job.
 
Putting this out there for anyone who needs it.

If you want to remove any old wallpaper/border, fill a spray bottle 1/2 water and 1/2 vinegar, spray on the paper, wait 5 minutes and scrape off with a plastic scraper.

It'll take the paper and glue right off so you can paint without having to sand or anything else.
 
Putting this out there for anyone who needs it.

If you want to remove any old wallpaper/border, fill a spray bottle 1/2 water and 1/2 vinegar, spray on the paper, wait 5 minutes and scrape off with a plastic scraper.

It'll take the paper and glue right off so you can paint without having to sand or anything else.
Good tip. We have another bathroom that eventually needs to be de-wallpapered. It's not a garish pattern, and it's a big ass bathroom, so I'm not in a huge hurry. It almost looks like the builders put it directly on the sheetrock though. Going to be pain I think.
 
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