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Thread: Any glaring issues with my driver swing

  1. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by leftshot View Post
    First of all, there is a lot to like in your swing. At waist high on the backswing, you are in a good position. You are also in a good position at the top. I think the cross the line is all or mostly an illusion because of the camera angle. A better down the line angle would confirm that one way or the other. Where things get sideways is on your downswing. Specifically, you are standing up the club at the beginning of the downswing and casting the club. By waist high, you've lost all your lag and the clubhead is still 3 feet from reaching the ball. Essentially, you are throwing the clubhead down and behind you on the downswing and overcoming the backward motion by a strong (and early) lower body thrust toward the target that then forces an early release (casting) of the club.

    The good news is that you've got the potential to drive the ball much farther by correcting these swing faults.

    What we need to do is get your downswing to be more shallow and rotational where you gather speed and retain lag late into the swing.

    The pump drill is a classic that will help you get a better feel for the sequencing and what it feels like to have lag late into your downswing. But I suspect you'll need to work on three other things to put this all together. A better grip, an understanding of how the hands and wrists should work, and getting deeper and sitting into your backswing. If you rely on the pump drill without working on the other items you'll likely end up with an up and down arm-dominated swing out in front of you. That's not where we want you to end up.
    Appreciate it. So what's the "easiest" thing to incorporate immediately that wouldn't hurt my swing? I could work on whatever that is and take it from there one step at a time.

  2. #17
    Club Pro uitar99's Avatar
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    The guy at meandmygolf.com had a pretty simple explanation. Golf Swing Pump Drill To Create Lag.

    I'm a slow learner-but I'm starting to learn that these boring drills are how I improve.
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  3. #18

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    Appreciate all the input so far and look forward to Freddie analyzing my swing as well. The pump drill looks good but as stated already, I will hold off on that and work on the more basic techniques required first. I think the most obvious starting point would be my grip. I've watched videos of it and try my best to mimic it but maybe there is an end-all video that best shows the grip and easy to understand?

  4. #19
    whoop de hell mbenro's Avatar
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    You've got a pretty good swing to start with, not much to tinker with here. Keep it simple. Your arms and shoulders form a triangle, start backswing with your shoulders, try not to break wrists until they need to as you get towards the top, good to feel almost a pause at the top, although everybody develops their own tempo. So, your shoulders start the backswing eventually taking the hips with them, make a good turn getting your back to the target, reverse the process starting your downswing with your hips and legs getting the big muscles involved. You should feel as though your pulling the club through the swing, not pushing with what I am assuming is your dominate side. In the video provided you're not quite transferring weight to the left side as you complete your swing, as mentioned by McGlovin. There's almost a bit of a recoil after impact. Nothing like a good set of eyes to watch you at the range. Golf isn't the cheapest activity, but a lesson or two is money better spent than playing 18 holes and scratching your head after every shot. You're off to a great start, so good luck and enjoy. If you benefit from visual learning, the ladies on the tour are by and large more mechanically sound as most don't try to muscle the ball.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbenro View Post
    You've got a pretty good swing to start with, not much to tinker with here. Keep it simple. Your arms and shoulders form a triangle, start backswing with your shoulders, try not to break wrists until they need to as you get towards the top, good to feel almost a pause at the top, although everybody develops their own tempo. So, your shoulders start the backswing eventually taking the hips with them, make a good turn getting your back to the target, reverse the process starting your downswing with your hips and legs getting the big muscles involved. You should feel as though your pulling the club through the swing, not pushing with what I am assuming is your dominate side. In the video provided you're not quite transferring weight to the left side as you complete your swing, as mentioned by McGlovin. There's almost a bit of a recoil after impact. Nothing like a good set of eyes to watch you at the range. Golf isn't the cheapest activity, but a lesson or two is money better spent than playing 18 holes and scratching your head after every shot. You're off to a great start, so good luck and enjoy. If you benefit from visual learning, the ladies on the tour are by and large more mechanically sound as most don't try to muscle the ball.
    Yeah I definitely know I have to work on getting my weight shifting into my left side. Just feels strange trying to hit up on the ball and maintaining that right shoulder slant while pushing the weight over there. I do plan on getting a lesson or two this year, just wanted to see what I could do on my own so I'm not going into it only walking away with basic stuff like my grip etc. I took one lesson at the start and he basically spent 30 minutes talking about grip which is something I really could've learned myself before going ya know? So the more fundamentally sound I can get before the lesson, the more bang for my buck.

  7. #21
    whoop de hell mbenro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iamachine1976 View Post
    First I will say I am no expert. That is for sure. I do notice (one reason is because I have struggled with this throughout my life) down the line it looks like you are crossing the line or not laid off enough. Eliminating this can help a lot with consistency. One way that helps me is to focus on what your hands "wrists" are doing at the top. At the transition you try to cup you wrists more and hinge your wrists less. You seem to be able to turn pretty well. Unhinging and cupping more can help you drop that right elbow into your body with a more laid off alignment of the club. Or more pointed at your target. This helps me a lot. Someone will probably thrash me on this thread for not saying something right. But I'm just speaking from my own experience. Hopefully I explained myself well enough. Anyhoot. Just something that helps me hit more consistently with the driver. I am known to get across the line when I don't mind my one piece take away and don't unhinge my right wrist at the transition to the downswing. Even if you unhinge some without cupping the wrist at the top it can help a lot.

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
    I forgot to mention great reference to the "one piece take away" by iamachine1976, one of the first things I learned when disecting the golf swing some, gulp, 35 years ago. I've watched your videos several times more, and again, you've got a very good swing to work with. Grip looks good, left hand may be a little strong, but nothing wrong with that. You get to parallel at the top, really just need to commit to completing the transfer to the left side. You load up pretty well on your back leg, focus on your feet, you should never feel weight on the outside of your right foot, if you do you're probably swaying, an easy fault to slip into at times. Posture looks pretty good. There is a guy by the name of George Gankass, pretty cerebral outside the box thinker, has some good videos to watch. He's a believer in letting the right elbow fly a little bit, counter to what I've used forever and that is keeping it tight to your body. One thing I did pick up from him though is posture. He preaches arm pits over the balls of your feet. You'll feel perfectly balanced, I've tried it and will continue to use it as one of my pre swing checkpoints. I have a tendency to reach at times, which flattens out the swing. I wouldn't focus too much on swinging up at the ball with your driver. If you set up with your hands and nose right behind the ball with your left shoulder slightly tilted up, then all you have to do is return the face of the club at the position of address as you swing through the ball. The club head will automatically be slightly on the way up at impact. The last little bit of advice is grip pressure. Try to relax your hands before take away, you're hands will re-grip when you take it away with the right pressure. Tension (white knuckles) is a killer. Have fun, at almost 62 I'm still hitting as good as I ever have and love the game more each year. Hope I haven't polluted what's between your ears too much, that's the other half of the battle.
    Irons: Apex 19 Combo 4-AW, Modus 105 S
    Wedges: Vokey SM6 56, 60
    Hybrid: XR 3
    Fairway: GBB Epic 3
    Driver ST190HL, Tensei Blue R
    Putter Newport Studio Stainless
    Ball: Pro V1x (usually)

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    iamachine1976 (04-27-2019)

  9. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by mbenro View Post
    I forgot to mention great reference to the "one piece take away" by iamachine1976, one of the first things I learned when disecting the golf swing some, gulp, 35 years ago. I've watched your videos several times more, and again, you've got a very good swing to work with. Grip looks good, left hand may be a little strong, but nothing wrong with that. You get to parallel at the top, really just need to commit to completing the transfer to the left side. You load up pretty well on your back leg, focus on your feet, you should never feel weight on the outside of your right foot, if you do you're probably swaying, an easy fault to slip into at times. Posture looks pretty good. There is a guy by the name of George Gankass, pretty cerebral outside the box thinker, has some good videos to watch. He's a believer in letting the right elbow fly a little bit, counter to what I've used forever and that is keeping it tight to your body. One thing I did pick up from him though is posture. He preaches arm pits over the balls of your feet. You'll feel perfectly balanced, I've tried it and will continue to use it as one of my pre swing checkpoints. I have a tendency to reach at times, which flattens out the swing. I wouldn't focus too much on swinging up at the ball with your driver. If you set up with your hands and nose right behind the ball with your left shoulder slightly tilted up, then all you have to do is return the face of the club at the position of address as you swing through the ball. The club head will automatically be slightly on the way up at impact. The last little bit of advice is grip pressure. Try to relax your hands before take away, you're hands will re-grip when you take it away with the right pressure. Tension (white knuckles) is a killer. Have fun, at almost 62 I'm still hitting as good as I ever have and love the game more each year. Hope I haven't polluted what's between your ears too much, that's the other half of the battle.
    No you haven't haha don't worry. One thing you pointed is something I know for a fact I need to work on and it's tough. Tight grip. I catch myself doing it sometimes, then try to ease up, but find myself right back to doing it again. I've heard the whole "pretend you have an injured bird thing in your hands etc." I can't wrap my head around holding a club so lightly and swinging it at 100mph lol. And I guess you're right about hitting up on the ball. As long as the setup is right, it will naturally happen. Guess I should drop that swing thought on my downswing and just worry about returning to the ball smoothly and transferring weight.

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