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Thread: 1960's - 1980's Equipment Question (for long time players)

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    Amateur havingfun's Avatar
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    1960's - 1980's Equipment Question (for long time players)

    First: I'm placing this question in Golf Talk because the equipment forum is dominated by modern equipment reviews and this is more a curiosity.

    Background: Today most of us play with clubs that are easier to hit than the clubs the pros use. They have blades and small cavity backs that allow highly skilled players to shape shots. The vast majority of us use clubs with 'game-improvement' or 'super game-improvement' technology that helps get the ball in the air and go far.

    Question: In the 1960's-1980's were the clubs the pro's used easier or harder to use than consumer models?

    Were Wilson Sam Snead Blue Ridge clubs easier to hit than Wilson Staff Dyna-Power models because they were for consumers or were Dyna-Power models easier to hit because they had the latest technology of the era?

    I notice that both sets were often paired with Wilson/Wilson-Staff model 4300 woods.
    Last edited by havingfun; 06-11-2019 at 09:21 AM. Reason: spelling
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    Club Pro RayG's Avatar
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    If you learned to play or played in the 60s and 70s, you played blades. There were no options for GI or SGI clubs. Club heads were essentially the same for everyone. What was different to pro clubs was custom fitting, shaft selection (even those were limited at the time) and the quality of the steel itself. Northwestern cranked out vast numbers of sets for beginners AND better players. But both were blades, with the players clubs probably getting more quality control. Wilson and others did the same.


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    Basically this is spot on. The divergence started with the Ping Eye irons. Those were the game changers for your average Joe.

    Quote Originally Posted by RayG View Post
    If you learned to play or played in the 60’s and 70’s, you played blades. There were no options for GI or SGI clubs. Club heads were essentially the same for everyone. What was different to ‘pro’ clubs was custom fitting, shaft selection (even those were limited at the time) and the quality of the steel itself. Northwestern cranked out vast numbers of sets for beginners AND better players. But both were blades, with the players clubs probably getting more quality control. Wilson and others did the same.





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    Wasn't club fitting of the day finding the hottest heads for woods and finding each iron without any hot spots that give inconstant distances.

    Amateurs just had to deal with what they were sold and couldn't test 10 of the same brand.
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    Quote Originally Posted by havingfun View Post
    First: I'm placing this question in Golf Talk because the equipment forum is dominated by modern equipment reviews and this is more a curiosity.

    Background: Today most of us play with clubs that are easier to hit than the clubs the pros use. They have blades and small cavity backs that allow highly skilled players to shape shots. The vast majority of us use clubs with 'game-improvement' or 'super game-improvement' technology that helps get the ball in the air and go far.

    Question: In the 1960's-1980's were the clubs the pro's used easier or harder to use than consumer models?

    Were Wilson Sam Snead Blue Ridge clubs easier to hit than Wilson Staff Dyna-Power models because they were for consumers or were Dyna-Power models easier to hit because they had the latest technology of the era?

    I notice that both sets were often paired with Wilson/Wilson-Staff model 4300 woods.
    Wilson staff1200 GE come out in late 70s they were a GI iron. There were option but not many options.


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    Good observations here. I remember reading lots about the Wilson 1200 GE. My first set was a set of Sam Snead Blue Ridge - D, 3W, 5W and 2i-PW for $90 at a catalog showroom. They worked, but they weren't easy to hit. Besides the 1200 GE, the other irons I remember that claimed to be easy to hit were the Spalding Executives. They featured a low CG which made it easier to get the ball up in the air. They in fact worked as advertised. Spalding made these for about 20 years, and I played them for about 10 years beginning in the mid-80s. I remember I had a choice of wood or metal D/3/5 and I let the sales guy talk me out of the metals to my later regret
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