Lamkin Grips

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As a former high school coach, the treatment and prevention of athletic injuries is something that I am incredibly familiar with. It’s a physiological fact that ice and compression are two of the essential elements to the recovery of athletic injuries and they also aid in chronic ailments. Combine this background with chronic aches of my own and it becomes pretty obvious why I was so excited when I was told I would be reviewing an ice and compression device from a company named Hyperice.

 

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About Hyperice

In 2010, Hyperice set out to create the world’s first high performance portable ice compression device. The Hyperice design team collaborated with engineers at Marton Precision Inc, an Orange County based aerospace manufacturing company. This combination of innovative design and cutting edge engineering produced the technology that is at the core of Hyperice and our products. After a year of testing our products on some of the world’s best athletes and fine tuning the products to fit their needs, we continue to improve our designs with the aim of perfecting the world’s finest line of ice compression gear.

From Hyperice

Each Hyperice device is composed of two parts that work together as a system to maximize cold and compression and deliver optimal cold therapy. These two components are: 

1) Hyperice Ice Cell with air release technology

The Ice Cell provides the “cold” component by harnessing the power of real ice which is loaded into the Ice Cell each time the Hyperice is used. Real ice is a powerful topical anti-inflammatory agent because of its superior ability to remove heat from the body and reduce tissue temperatures. 

AIR RELEASE VALVE -The patented air release valve removes air from the ice cell to enable maximum compression. When applied to the body, ice draws heat out of the body, slowly melting the ice to water. As this happens, pockets of air build up in the ice cell creating a barrier between the ice and the compression wrap. Releasing air from the ice cell allows the compression wrap to maintain constant pressure on the ice, thereby delivering optimal compression throughout the icing process. 

2) Hyperice Compression Wrap 

Each Hyperice compression wrap is designed to apply firm pressure to the Ice Cell, pushing all excess air trapped in the cell to the surface. By pressing the air release valve, the excess air is removed from the unit- allowing the compression wrap to make direct contact with the ice, forming an “ice cast” around the desired body part. 

INNOVATIVE DESIGN Each Hyperice compression wrap is specifically designed to provide optimal compression to specific body parts. Every line, curve, and groove has been carefully positioned to optimize form, fit, and function. Multidirectional straps and tension layers are just a few of the innovative features that have been implemented in the first generation product line.

Product Quality

The Hyperice knee and utility devices both arrived in their own storage containers. These containers are heavy duty round tubes, which I could see being incredibly useful in a training room setting where many different devices for different body regions would be stored. The container itself also seems to serve another purpose, as it has holes in the bottom that will allow both for airflow for draining out and drying the excess water that may exist after use.

The actual “Hyperice Ice Cell” is made up of rubber material and they will vary in size according to the specific device that is being used. The thing of note here is actually the lid of the ice cell. Hyperice utilizes a screw-on lid that features an air release valve in order to allow the ice cell to be at its most effective on the area of treatment. This isn’t just a simple screw on lid. There is clearly a lot of attention to detail that went into it.  Simply put, when held in hand it becomes very clear that a lot of R&D and attention to making a product that will last went into the devices.

Obviously, the ice cell is important, but so too is the compression wrap that must put the ice on the proper regions of the affected area and keep it there during use. The wrap itself is made of heavy duty neoprene, which is common of most braces that you see on the market. It lasts and is easy to clean, which are obviously good things. Additionally, the wraps utilize lower-profile Velcro on the straps in order to keep it secure when placed, but also prevent damage and wear to the neoprene. To me it is the little things like this that clearly indicate it is not a haphazardly put together product. A lot of focus went into the entire package.

Product Use

Let’s be honest here, the application of ice to an injury is not a difficult thing to do, nor should it be. It is because of this that some may have initial thoughts that the Hyperice is unnecessary and complicating something that is otherwise very simple, but I truly believe that is a misguided thought.

Basic use of the Hyperice devices is very simple. You simply unscrew the lid of the ice cell, and insert the ice to fill it about two-thirds of the way. From here it is as simple as putting the device in the compression wrap, applying it snugly to the area of intended treatment, and then pressing the air release valve. I will say that just as Hyperice recommends, I did find that crushed ice from a refrigerator works best, but I also used full ice cubes without any issue other than a slight shape variation on the area the Hyperice was being used on. It is about as straight forward and simple as it can possibly be in my opinion.

Where the Hyperice shines most in my opinion compared to traditional ice packs is with just how well it places the ice on the given area of the body. The air release valve becomes the star here, as once you apply the wrap to your body and press the valve the ice cell actually form fits around the area. In an area like my knee, the device actually allowed the ice to wrap all the way around my knee, covering all of the major ligament and tendon regions. Additionally, the compression wrap kept the ice there with zero movement and even allowed for me to move around while icing my knee, something I cannot do when using an ACE bandage or tape. 

Parting Thoughts

For me, this was an incredibly pleasant review to get to do because the product really does just stand out and deliver on all fronts. The Hyperice devices are available for various areas (utility, knee, back, shoulder, and extended shoulder) and have an MSRP ranging from $90.00 to $130.00. Although it may be difficult for some to justify the higher price point compared standard freezer ice packs, I truly feel that the Hyperice is much more effective for pinpointing and treating a specific area. Although it is not a golf specific item, it is certainly worth looking into for anyone who suppers chronic aches/pains and utilizes ice for treatment.

For more information, be sure to check out the Hyperice website at www.hyperice.com.

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About the Author ()

James is a staff writer for The Hackers Paradise along with being a professional educator. With his background in education James seeks to broaden his own knowledge while also sharing it with all those who share his passion for the game.

Comments (11)

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  1. DawgDaddy says:

    Great job James, I do find the price to be somewhat high but I see much value to someone who needs daily treatment for a chronic injury.

  2. Freddie Kong says:

    Very cool device but at that price point I see don’t see this for personal use. I like that it Conforms to the area that needs the therapy and I’m sure the ice last longer in the compression bag. Good job on the review James, well done.

  3. #Cookie says:

    Another solid review here James! Having had the opportunity to see/hold this product in person I can attest to the quality of what the buyer receives. Nothing was spared in the build quality of this.

    While its not cheap price wise, if I had a true need for it I would purchase based on what I saw in person and what I read here.

  4. jmatt says:

    If you iced areas daily, or used it in a team setting, this looks like a good product. Lifespan should be substantial from what I can see. For myself, I’ll probably stick with the frozen peas.

  5. Ryan Hawk says:

    Very cool idea and great review of the features James.

  6. TheDue says:

    Great job, James. Kind of expensive, but looks like something that might last and can travel well.

  7. ddec says:

    It’s an interesting idea. I know it’s something I could use.

  8. DevRickus says:

    Great idea. Price point is a little high. I was hooked until I got down to the price. Still might take a crack at it for my wrist/thumb chronic pain. Thanks James. Well done as always.

  9. Jason K says:

    I have always used those freezer gel packs myself but this definitely sounds like a very solid option. I don’t think I’d personally drop that kind of cash when other options are available however. Thanks for the solid write up buddy!

  10. Nate says:

    Very cool Jman! Thanks for doing this. I know you put it through the tests! I’m going to keep this one in the back of my mind for any future issues that may arise. Great job.

  11. d_in_la says:

    Great review and discussion of the benefits. While the initial price is high, the utility also seems quite high. And, I suppose, first to market also makes something like this a little more expensive at first. Well done overall.

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