The Home Renovation Thread

Jman

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mmaynard11

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Also, f**k sanding walls and ceilings. More affirmation that the inventor of popcorn ceilings should have been shot on the spot.

Vaccum setup is great for a first hit, but, the screens just don’t sand as smooth, so it’s a both kinda project on the ceiling now.
Sanding is awful!!! Dust gets everywhere!!!
 

mmaynard11

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I’ve been doing a lot of work around the house. We weren’t willing to pay the outrageous custom build prices prior to closing so I put some of my less than stellar woodworking skills to work.

Hoping to have the finishing touches on my bookcase & cabinets in my office.

8A96D5F7-3C76-4815-9E9B-2E90795A93A2.jpeg
 

Jman

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mmaynard11

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I know it’s inevitable...but damn. :LOL:
And I’m the guy that doesn’t want to move everything out of the space I’m working in. Oh how I wish I would have rethought a prior to sanding.
 

Jman

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And I’m the guy that doesn’t want to move everything out of the space I’m working in. Oh how I wish I would have rethought a prior to sanding.
Hahaha, the ONLY saving grace to my rage is that we are ripping the carpet out after this and the walls are bare before shiplap after the ceiling is done.
 

mmaynard11

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Hahaha, the ONLY saving grace to my rage is that we are ripping the carpet out after this and the walls are bare before shiplap after the ceiling is done.
Pro tip...if your painting the shiplap any other color than white...paint the under side of the gaps before you hang it.
It will save you hours.
 

Jman

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Pro tip...if your painting the shiplap any other color than white...paint the under side of the gaps before you hang it.
It will save you hours.
Yup! Thankfully, boss wants white. :LOL:

We went with an already primed version for making life easier before painting, but it’s still gonna be tedious I know.

Yay?
 

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Yup! Thankfully, boss wants white. :LOL:

We went with an already primed version for making life easier before painting, but it’s still gonna be tedious I know.

Yay?
If your going white you shouldnt have to paint the gaps. Hanging and painting the shiplap is Pretty easy.
I just bought this paint sprayer and man made life simple on the last few projects I’ve done.
 

greekelite

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Well this was not fun (n)
20210320_182805.jpg

I'd say its like 70% level lol at a certain point i just had the F its and just started throwing rock and papers

Don't think I'll be golfing tomorrow, already feel super stiff
 

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@JB and @ GolferGal -

Looks great! Have you/did you consider retractable screens? My neighbor reps for a company and installs them on a lot of high end homes. Great product.
 

JB

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@JB and @ GolferGal -

Looks great! Have you/did you consider retractable screens? My neighbor reps for a company and installs them on a lot of high end homes. Great product.
Thank you.
No, being from FL, where nearly every home has the cage, it is what we wanted. We have a pretty large yard, so plenty of room to roam free, but with the kitchen and sofa, the screens were definitely our preference.
 

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Well this was not fun (n)
View attachment 8998905

I'd say its like 70% level lol at a certain point i just had the F its and just started throwing rock and papers

Don't think I'll be golfing tomorrow, already feel super stiff
It looks good. I feel bad we didn't tell you the best way to get the rock bed level is to get some lengths of black pipe, lay them firmly into the space, level them, and use the 2x4 as a screed to level the rocks before tamping. Lather, rinse, repeat.

At this point, if the pavers are close to level, composite shims are your friend.
 

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It looks good. I feel bad we didn't tell you the best way to get the rock bed level is to get some lengths of black pipe, lay them firmly into the space, level them, and use the 2x4 as a screed to level the rocks before tamping. Lather, rinse, repeat.

At this point, if the pavers are close to level, composite shims are your friend.
All good, I made it work with the 2x4 but its more the inside papers. I can still pull up one by one and add some extra pebbles. May do the string leveling trick, but the shed should still go up pretty well as it is. Appreciate the suggestions though!
 

Jman

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I’m. Tired. Of. Sanding.
 

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Jman

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Joshnoble01

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On a scale of 0-100 what chance do I have of learning this stuff when I am a desk jockey. New home purchase means complete replacement of floor for upstairs, downstairs and stairs. Kitchen flooring and counters.

Bathroom projects don’t need to happen immediately.

Also means renovation of condo I have lived in for 13 years. Kitchen is still mint. One bathroom is fine. Another needs a complete overhaul although it is just a shower stall and not full bath. But shower pan definitely needs to be replaced. Worried about potential dry rot.

Other than that condo just needs paint. Really just the one bathroom.
 

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On a scale of 0-100 what chance do I have of learning this stuff when I am a desk jockey. New home purchase means complete replacement of floor for upstairs, downstairs and stairs. Kitchen flooring and counters.

Bathroom projects don’t need to happen immediately.

Also means renovation of condo I have lived in for 13 years. Kitchen is still mint. One bathroom is fine. Another needs a complete overhaul although it is just a shower stall and not full bath. But shower pan definitely needs to be replaced. Worried about potential dry rot.

Other than that condo just needs paint. Really just the one bathroom.
Personally, I think the average person has an 80% chance - minimum - of being able to tackle major projects successfully. That said:
  • Do you have a history of DIY in your family?
  • What is the most ambitious household project you have tackled? Automotive? Carpentry?
  • Do you have trusted family member/friend who can help/support/teach you?
I've surprised myself with some of the things I have tackled, starting with a decent set of tools. a set of Time-Life home repair books, determination, and patience. You kids today have a lot more resources:
  • There are discussion forums for just about every project you would desire to undertake. For example, this is a terrific source for all things tile: https://www.johnbridge.com/
  • If there's not a forum for it, and even if there is, there's probably a YouTube video showing how to do it. I recommend checking multiple sources to make sure you are using the best information out there.
  • Building supply stores are very good at offering guidance to DIYers.

If you're fairly new, I recommend starting with something relatively inexpensive and easily reversible. Putting laminate down in a small bedroom and the shower tub (because you have to) sound like good first projects. Replacing the kitchen countertop, or installing a large ceramic tile floor, should wait until you have a little more experience, especially if you're using something more exotic and expensive than laminate.

Finally, expect scope creep. Plan for it. Things will take you longer the first time because you're learning. When you rip out that shower tub, you'll almost certainly find a problem, like some rotted wood or a stubborn plumbing fixture. It's normal, and a chance to learn new words.;)

I don't want to discourage you. It's highly satisfying to do your own stuff. Start with jobs within your abilities and go from there. Here are some of the things I've done:
  • Built a large deck connecting our home and an above-ground pool.
  • Fixed a major standing water problem in our back yard.
  • Installed drains around the inside of our basement to fix a water problem.
  • Tore full and half baths down to the studs and joists and rebuilt them.
  • Replaced every window and door in our home with new construction windows.
  • Removed two layers of vinyl flooring in our kitchen and replaced it with ceramic tile after reinforcing the joists.

If I can do these, so can you.
 

Joshnoble01

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Personally, I think the average person has an 80% chance - minimum - of being able to tackle major projects successfully. That said:
  • Do you have a history of DIY in your family?
  • What is the most ambitious household project you have tackled? Automotive? Carpentry?
  • Do you have trusted family member/friend who can help/support/teach you?
I've surprised myself with some of the things I have tackled, starting with a decent set of tools. a set of Time-Life home repair books, determination, and patience. You kids today have a lot more resources:
  • There are discussion forums for just about every project you would desire to undertake. For example, this is a terrific source for all things tile: https://www.johnbridge.com/
  • If there's not a forum for it, and even if there is, there's probably a YouTube video showing how to do it. I recommend checking multiple sources to make sure you are using the best information out there.
  • Building supply stores are very good at offering guidance to DIYers.

If you're fairly new, I recommend starting with something relatively inexpensive and easily reversible. Putting laminate down in a small bedroom and the shower tub (because you have to) sound like good first projects. Replacing the kitchen countertop, or installing a large ceramic tile floor, should wait until you have a little more experience, especially if you're using something more exotic and expensive than laminate.

Finally, expect scope creep. Plan for it. Things will take you longer the first time because you're learning. When you rip out that shower tub, you'll almost certainly find a problem, like some rotted wood or a stubborn plumbing fixture. It's normal, and a chance to learn new words.;)

I don't want to discourage you. It's highly satisfying to do your own stuff. Start with jobs within your abilities and go from there. Here are some of the things I've done:
  • Built a large deck connecting our home and an above-ground pool.
  • Fixed a major standing water problem in our back yard.
  • Installed drains around the inside of our basement to fix a water problem.
  • Tore full and half baths down to the studs and joists and rebuilt them.
  • Replaced every window and door in our home with new construction windows.
  • Removed two layers of vinyl flooring in our kitchen and replaced it with ceramic tile after reinforcing the joists.

If I can do these, so can you.
Lot's of DIY in my family. My father was a contractor in his 20s and he went belly up during savings and loans in the early 80s trying to build custom homes and went to work as a truck driver at UPS.

My brother helped me do the floors in my current home. He worked construction for a couple years in his 20's. We did cheap laminates from Costco. He was unemployed at time and I was required by my job to take at least one 2 week vacation a years. We got 750 feet done 90% and then did finishing work and paint of baseboards over next couple months. I still think it is good to go to rent. My wife thinks it needs to be replaced on top of the new home purchase.

My wife's brother is also handy and my brother in law is too. Just finding the time to get them down here all at same time and me being able to time the work.

I personally never got into DIY because my parents were adamant that I work with my brain and get a professional white collar job because of there struggles until my father finished driving trucks and moved into middle management at UPS and my mom finished her dental hygiene program in her early 30s. They insisted I go to college. Construction was something that they didn't want me to get into for some reason. I talked to my mom about it this week and she said she didn't know why she was so adamant about it at the time and wish she hadn't viewed early failures as reasons not to try things again but to do something safer.

Truthfully I can figure it out I think. It's not like I am an idiot. Just never done this and never found an interest in it up to this point. I am a worker and grinder and love learning so that part should help.
 

Knot Right

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Also, f**k sanding walls and ceilings. More affirmation that the inventor of popcorn ceilings should have been shot on the spot.

Vaccum setup is great for a first hit, but, the screens just don’t sand as smooth, so it’s a both kinda project on the ceiling now.
I just finished scraping and skimming 5 popcorn ceilings this past week on a flip house, and I've probably done a couple hundred ceilings over the years.

I use the USG low dust compound for these jobs. It's a bit thicker than the USG "blue top" or "lime top" lightweight compounds and bit tougher on the wrists when pulling it with a 10" broad knife, but it's the best out there when it comes to sanding.

95% of the particulates from sanding drop straight down instead of hanging in the air and attaching to everything in the house. I use round sanding heads with 120 grit. I use vacuum systems some times, but they seem to take more time than than they are worth unless I am in a occupied home, and even then I'll quite often set up a couple box fans to create negative ventilation and move the air away from the occupied areas of the home out through a door or window.

gallery-large.876.657.jpg
 

greekelite

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On a scale of 0-100 what chance do I have of learning this stuff when I am a desk jockey. New home purchase means complete replacement of floor for upstairs, downstairs and stairs. Kitchen flooring and counters.

Bathroom projects don’t need to happen immediately.

Also means renovation of condo I have lived in for 13 years. Kitchen is still mint. One bathroom is fine. Another needs a complete overhaul although it is just a shower stall and not full bath. But shower pan definitely needs to be replaced. Worried about potential dry rot.

Other than that condo just needs paint. Really just the one bathroom.
I am like you and had minimal experience in DIY projects, but had even less exposure to it when I was younger. The fanciest thing my dad built was a firewood holder.. it fell apart in 2 years

But, if you want videos and instructions, it kind of becomes easy. I have never done any projects and so far I have replaces 2 bathroom vanities and did some backsplash tiling, replaced a bottom and top cabinet, replaced ceiling fans, flooring in my old condo, wall features, etc, and painting... lost of painting which is probably the easiest thing

Some things I may not be comfortable doing would be major plumbing or electrical work, but I think the shower job you're describing should be pretty straight forward. Its just taking the time to doing it all
 

Greg Kulbick

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I can figure out anything. I've been taking stuff apart and putting it back together as long as I can remember.
 

Jman

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Last go through of some skimming and filling on the living room ceiling last night. Today is get it all sanded...again....day. HS tournament to coach tomorrow so it’ll give me a day or so to get it all wiped down afterwards and prepped to texture. Going to rent a spray gun and put a light orange peel on, it matches the half of the house we had renovated so it makes the most sense.

Have all my primer ready for after that’s cured and set later in the week, hopefully I can be on to installing the shiplap and cased openings by the coming weeks end.

Doc is getting restless...but dammit it’s going to look so good.
 

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